Place to be Nation Presents: Real World Champion (2008-2014)

The staff over at Place to be Nation have voted to determine which wrestler in North America earned the title of the “Real World Champion” for each given year. Wrestlers were determined by the following factors: workrate, drawing ability, influence, and general overall presentation. Don’t think of this as which actual champion was the best but rather which wrestler of a given year best represented a combination of all these factors, the factors in which you would look for in a champion. Click on the link below to read the article and comment here too to voice your opinion on the selections. 

http://placetobenation.com/ptbns-real-world-champion-2008-2014/

Place to be Nation Presents: Real World Champion (2001-2007)

The staff over at Place to be Nation have voted to determine which wrestler in North America earned the title of the “Real World Champion” for each given year. Wrestlers were determined by the following factors: workrate, drawing ability, influence, and general overall presentation. Don’t think of this as which actual champion was the best but rather which wrestler of a given year best represented a combination of all these factors, the factors in which you would look for in a champion. Click on the link below to read the article and comment here too to voice your opinion on the selections. 

http://placetobenation.com/ptbns-real-world-champion-2001-2007/

Place to be Nation Presents: Real World Champion 1995-2000

The staff over at Place to be Nation have voted to determine which wrestler in North America earned the title of the “Real World Champion” for each given year. Wrestlers were determined by the following factors: workrate, drawing ability, influence, and general overall presentation. Don’t think of this as which actual champion was the best but rather which wrestler of a given year best represented a combination of all these factors, the factors in which you would look for in a champion. Click on the link below to read the article and comment here too to voice your opinion on the selections.

http://placetobenation.com/ptbns-real-world-champion-1995-2000/

Place to be Nation Presents: Real World Champion 1989-94

The staff over at Place to be Nation have voted to determine which wrestler in North America earned the title of the “Real World Champion” for each given year. Wrestlers were determined by the following factors: workrate, drawing ability, influence, and general overall presentation. Don’t think of this as which actual champion was the best but rather which wrestler of a given year best represented a combination of all these factors, the factors in which you would look for in a champion. Click on the link below to read the article and comment here too to voice your opinion on the selections.

http://placetobenation.com/ptbns-real-world-champion-1989-1994/

Throwback link for the blog about miz and the Real World

Found this article while cleaning out my mailbox. Article on the Real World season The Miz was on, from right before when the season in question debuted, which singles him out as far as his presence on the show embodying how far the franchise had fallen in terms of the franchise becoming formulaic and cliched.  

I only watched a couple of episodes of the season in question when it first aired (Real World pretty much jumped the shark around Seattle/Hawaii and Hawaii itself pretty much was a clusterfuck of fail that broke the franchise) but I'm curious, given the retroactive fame issue and that that The Miz is one of the ultra few Real World cast members to go on to amount to anything, why the WWE never really mentioned or brought up his Real World days when he became a centerpiece of the company. Even when he was going toe-to-toe with John Cena, we never got to see Cena throw the Real World into Miz's face to mock him. Is the Real World off-limits by the WWE (which is insane given that you've had other wrestlers be upfront with their pasts and dirty laundry) or is it a matter of Vince, ever being several years behind the curve, not even knowing Miz was on the show, let alone what Real World is?

Jesse Baker     

 
 
image
 
 
 
 
 
“The Real World” refuses to grow up

The show that spawned reality television comes back for its 10th season, forgetting the lessons it taught everyone else.
Preview by Yahoo
 

​I never watched or even knew what the Real World was until many years after it was gone, but perhaps one had to be of a certain age and disposition to pay attention to it in the first place.  Might have also had to do with not getting MTV in Canada at the time it would have been airing.  ​

The real WWE problem


Scott, 

With all the hullabaloo over the Q3 earnings and the delay of the WWE network in the UK, I think people are missing an even bigger issue.

The WWE has yet to respond to the critics with a petulant wrestling gimmick.

From Irwin R. Schyster to Billionaire Ted to Right To Censor, the WWE has a long, storied history of mocking anyone who gave them shit. Where is that fire now? Where is the Financial Analyst wrestler decrying the WWE Network? The disgruntled investor? Why hasn't Bo Dallas been repackaged as a smarmy "Wolf of Wolf Street" type stockbroker who is working to lower the price of WWE stock so he can sell high later? He's VK Wallstreet Jr for crissakes! 

The Vince McMahon of old would deal with this criticism by wrapping it around a midcarder and having John Cena put him through a table every night until it went away.

Don't believe the hype. The real news is the WWE has grown up and grown soft. That is the real tragedy.

Mike

And they have BOTH MEMBERS of Money Inc under contract and working as agents!  
Clearly Vince went soft the moment he allowed himself to be talked out of beating up a guy in a panda suit in 2002.  It was all downhill from there.  

QOTD 127:A real fine place to start!

I’m in a romantic mood today mostly because the picture to the left is what I was up to on Tuesday with a lady who kinda sorta looked like Selena Gomez.

Thus, a sappily romantic question for those of us happily taken, unhappily taken, or on the way to being happily or unhappily taken.

Love at first sight? Yes or not? If yes, did it pan out for you long-term? What is your greatest courtship? 


What is the greatest courtship in the history of television? Jim / Pam?


What about pro-wrestling? I was a bit sappy for Steph & Test, but found myself fond of Kane & Tori, too.

Bonus: What are your top three most romantic songs? 1. Hands Clean by Alanis Morisette, 2. “Huckleberry” by Toby Keith 3. “I’m Yours” – Jason Mraz.

The most romantic song EVER is of course this classic gem from “Clerks”.


WWE Network Gets REAL, JACK!!!

WWE Network appears to be preparing for a dose of reality. Check out the story below:

From a survey that was sent out… – WWE has sent out a survey to fans on their mailing list asking for interest in several potential WWE Network reality shows. The shows and summaries of the pitches (via PWInsider) are below:

* Blackman’s Bounties: Former WWE star and legit badass Steve Blackman reality series following his bounty hunting team based out of Harrisburg, PA. Think Dog the Bounty Hunter.

* NXT: Behind the Scenes: A reality series following the talents trying to make it out of the Performance Center and to the main roster, looking at their work, their personal lives and the fraternity of the NXT brand, including the heartbreak of being cut. So, it’s Tough Enough-esque.

* Pros vs. Joes: Pretty much the same as the old SpikeTV series, pitting WWE talents against an average person in physical and non physical challenges. The non physical challenges listed included an air guitar competition. The physical challenges were described as similar to American Gladiators.

* WWE Around the World: Following WWE talents taking part in some of the scariest stunts and attractions around the world, such as shark diving and eating strange foods. It read as if it was modeled after some of the Travel Channel’s “Extreme” specials with a dash of Anthony Bordain’s No Reservations.

* WWE Dirty Jobs: Just like the Discovery Channel reality series of the same name, WWE talents have to perform unpleasant jobs, including going into Chicago sewers and picking up garbage in NYC.

* WWE Prankdown: a practical joke show that features WWE talents pulling tricks on unsuspecting “Superfans.” The example given was John Cena and Randy Orton both wanting to buy an expensive car and getting into a fight at the dealership, only to show the damage they caused was part of the show to trick the fan.

* WWE Rescue: a reality show where WWE talents come to the homes of “super fans” help them with their personal and business problems. Think Restaurant Impossible meets Nanny 911.

* WWE Ultimate Challenge: WWE’s version of CBS’ Amazing Race with a 12 hour extreme scavenger hunt in different cities.

* Xtreme WWE Collector: Starring “Super fan Michael Patterson” – basically a WWE version of Travel Channel’s Toy Hunter, except Patterson is chasing WWE toys and memorabilia.

Credit 411mania.com/wrestling and PWInsider.

WWE Network Updates in Real Time?

I'm watching Superbrawl 1997 and just noticed that little blips along the progress bar. Hovering over them reveals important points during the course of the. The start and end of each match. That's a nice touch.

These weren't present the first time I tried to watch the show just 15 minutes before.

My only complaint with the video archive is the freezing, which could easily be resolved by allowing things to load as they do on Youtube.  It seems to load ten seconds of video every five seconds, which is more complicated than it needs to be.

It's obviously a work-in-progress and they seem to be using us as their beta testers, which kind of sucks for obvious reasons because they should have just done, you know, BETA TESTING.  However, as much as I wish they were a bit more transparent with the issues and fixes, it's WWE so you get what you get and you don't get upset.  Last night I was able to watch the live stream on PS3 without an issue, and I even started the Countdown show from the beginning and then accidentally exited out and had to fast-forward through the archived version to catch up again.  And it worked BEAUTIFULLY!  So then I tried to watch the 1981 MSG show and I guess that was pressing my luck because it froze up at the 1:30 mark and never recovered.  
But yeah, if they'd set up a feedback site with status updates and stuff, I think there would be a lot more good will towards them.  But that's not how they roll.  

DDP Segment on HBO’s Real Sports

Howdy BoD’ers!

I got a chance to watch last night’s HBO Real Sports and catch the segment on DDP helping out Jake Roberts and Scott Hal with DDP Yoga. I just wanted to run down some of the key points of the segment that ran around 8-10 minutes.

— The opening sees DDP, Roberts and Hall sitting in recliners watching old footage of themselves.

— Roberts said he begged to die. As he saw his friends in the business dying he wondered why he couldn’t have been him. Roberts was raised by an alcoholic and sexually abused as a child. He broke down pretty quickly. He told Frank Deford (the guy doing the story) is that he was afraid “[Frank] was going to hurt him.” He was never able to explain why he felt that way. Or he did and it was cut.

— DDP says that Jake gave him the knowledge when no one else believed in him. Jake says he taught DDP wrestling psychology and how to read a crowd.

— DDP took up Yoga when he had a serious back injury that wasn’t improving. He mixed it in with his rehab and added old school calisthenics. Out of that he created DDP Yoga, which he describes as “non-peaceful Yoga”. He holds free classes at his home to his neighbors and over a dozen people come by daily.

— Page traveled to see Roberts and said he looked so brittle. DDP asked him to drop 20 pounds and he would move him to Atlanta. Roberts has now lost 60 pounds and Roberts does Yoga and other workouts daily.

— They chronicled Roberts’ set backs and the cameras catch DDP bitching Roberts out for getting drunk at an airport bar. He had another set back but he’s been clean for about 4-5 months now. Roberts says he wakes up excited and he’s staying at the “Accountability Crib” a.k.a. DDP’s Atlanta home for the foreseeable future. Roberts says that Page “ain’t getting rid of him.”

— They play the tape of DDP calling Scott Hall and Hall said he doesn’t remember the phone call because he was drunk out of his mind. Hall has taken 12 trips to rehab. Pills and booze became his routine because his life was falling apart. He said that Razor Ramon was living well but Hall was dying. When Hall arrived in Atlanta he describes himself as “Elvis before he went to die on the toilet.”

— Hall has lost 50 pounds and spends much of his non-Yoga time with his son Cody, who is trying to break in the business. He says he’s got a new lease on life. He moved out of the Accountability crib but according to his podcast with Steve Austin, he lives about a block or two away and spends most of his spare time there.

— DDP says Jake should have died 10-12 times but today he’s a different guy. Same with Hall. DDP knows there are no guarantees and both Roberts and Hall have been through too much to say their demons are gone for good. Roberts is deathly afraid of the mention of overcoming is demons but the segment closes with the three men, happy and growing old in health together.

— Deford discloses that DDP has sold over 50,000 copies of his $100 Yoga program, making for a nice little chunk of change.

My thoughts are simple: DDP is a hell of a guy. I’m convinced there are a lot of good characters in wrestling and few good men but he seems to be the real deal. Roberts and Hall look a billion times better than where we saw them at their lowest point. It was very nice and uplifting piece that would make you like DDP even more than you already do.

CAW in Real Life

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Austin Burton
Date: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 at 6:12 AM
Subject: WWE “pet projects”

Every smart wrestling fan is an armchair booker, and all of us have certain wrestlers we like to watch succeed but we believe aren’t being booked correctly.

So let’s say you’re a WWE writer and they’re letting you choose any three acts on the roster — singles or tag teams, main eventers or mid-carders — to be your “pet projects.”

You can tweak their character’s nuances or give them a complete makeover. You can decide how they work in the ring (within their limits), how they work the mic, whether they’re a heel or face, who they’re feuding with, who they’re affiliated with, etc. Of course you’d have to collaborate with the rest of the creative team on some things and you could get vetoed if your ideas are too crazy. (Making Jinder Mahal the WWE champ anytime soon wouldn’t fly.) But within reason, you’re basically deciding how your guys are presented and how they’re booked.

Who would you pick, and what are some changes you’d make?

I’d make Cena heel, first and foremost. His character would be the BIGGEST douche on Earth. The total jock-stereotype. He’d say things like “Every wrestler you’ve ever loved, I beat’em. I probably made’em tap out. I did with a smile, too”, “Look at me. When I take my shirt off, women cheer. You chumps in the audience could save the world and maybe get a golf clap. Me? I’m so good looking that I get cheers just for being shirtless”. I’d have him be champ for at least a year, and then Punk would return to stop Cena from not only beating his record, but from continuing his reign of terror, and for revenge. As Cena would have done a major beat down on Punk early in his reign, as Cena knew Punk could have his number and wanted him out of commission. I’d then create a stable for Cena, where he’d only let the best looking & athletic people join.

Also, Cena & Punk write their own promos, and Cena has to take that title with him every where he goes. Treating it like it’s a SuperBowl ring, and constantly flaunting it in public.

Caliber vs Fuj – FOR REAL

Welcome, ladies & gentlemen. Here, is the only way a beef can be solved. Inside the ring, at The BoD.

The PPV channel unscrambles finally, as
it’s time for the match-up the BoD has been waiting to see. The Fuj
vs Caliber Winfield.
The show opens up to show Scott Keith &
The Princess in respective formal wear, standing in front of a green
screen that shows the crowd, like the WWE use to do in the old days.
SK: Well, it’s taken a while for us to
reach this point, Princess, but I think the wait was worth it. I’ve
been drinking since 9am, and amazingly the alcohol has raised my
interest for the match.

Princess: Scott, I agree. I’d like
to see a clean fight, but it’s something I don’t think we’ll get.
SK: Of course, we’re trending world
wide! And don’t forget the BoD app on your phones! And don’t forget
to Tout whose side you’re on! And don’t forget we’re trending!
Princess: We’re really trending on
Twitter?
SK: What’s Twitter? Who cares. This
match up has been building for months, with Caliber & Fuj taking
jabs at one another in different places around the BoD, before almost
coming to blows in the Canadian Stampede thread. I think Bret would
be proud. Oh, Bret….
Princess: Are you tearing up?
SK: It’s just…I never got to tell him
that he was the greatest wrestler I’ve ever seen.
Princess: He’s not dead. You could
still tell him.
SK: Far too much effort. Let’s get down
to ringside!
The camera cuts to the ring inside BoD
Studios. We see the crowd filled with familiar faces. Cap Locks Man
holds up a sign that says “THIS SIGN IS IN ALL CAPS”. The front
row is filled with all the luminaries from the BoD; Cultstatus,
Jobber, xanadude, Adam Curry, Scotty Flamingo, and a host of others.
They talk amongst each other until “Why Cant We Be Friends” by
WAR plays over the PA system, signaling the arrival…


Ring Announcer Ryan Murphy: andj
comminh done the iasdle is….*throws up*
Brian Bayless runs up to grab the
microphone, and you can hear bits & pieces of their struggle over
the PA:


Ryan: I’m NOT drunkkek! LIAR!
Brian: Give it too–
Ryan finally passes out and is set
under the ring side. The janitor, Phredric is thankfully at ringside
and able to clean up the vomit. While the song still plays, Brian
takes up announcing duties:
Brian: Coming down the asile,
accompanied by his protege Sebastian Howard, he stands 5 foot 9, and he weighs in at a solid
249lbs, the man who is known as the John Cena of the BoD, he’s
dashing, he’s extremely handsome, he’s Caaaalliiiibeerrrr WINFIELD!
The camera pans to the wrestler’s
entrance. It’s similar to the original Attitude Era design, but with
the letters BoD on each side, like the original Nitro set. The ramp
goes from the entrance, to the ring, about 4 feet off the ground.
Just then, Sebastian Howard comes
through the curtains as he does a 180 and does the “finger point
gun thing” that Buff use to do. Then from the curtain emerges
Caliber Winfield. He’s wearing jeans, and a t-shirt with the word
“BONER” on it. It’d be a simple outfit if not for the red cape.
He and Sebastian saunter down to the ring. Caliber with his chest
puffed out, stops to jaw-jack with a couple fans sitting ringside.
Cultstatus: You blow, Winfield!
Caliber: HEY! You…uh….dammit,
Sebastian, defend me!
Sebastian: You don’t talk to Caliber
like that! He’ll tell Scott on you, and you could possibly get
banned, MISTER!

Caliber gives Cult a smug look of satisfaction. Then does the finger-point thing to Steven Ferrari, trusted editor whom Caliber met after his plane nose-dived into Parts Unknown.

They finally make it to the ring where
Caliber does a simple, yet glorious twirl. He stands up with his arms
out-stretched in a Jericho-like pose as Sebastian takes off his robe
and hands it to the guy outside, making sure to do the warning
towards him like Razor did with his gold. They stand on one side of
the ring as Sebastian holds up his hands, giving Caliber a place to
aim as he warms up with jabs.
WAR ends and The Misfits begin with
“Kong At The Gates”. 

Brian: Coming down the isle, standing at 6 foot 4, and weighing 230lbs, he’s the self-proclaimed #1 Draw at the BoD, he is THE FUJ!
A determined looking Fuj, wearing a classic
wrestling singlet, comes through the curtains with a Japanese flag
that has “Cleveland” written on the bottom. The crowd is mostly
cheers, and we see Adam Curry out in the crowd with a “this guy
gets it” sign, which just so happens to be next to Wanker’s sign of
“Insert sperm joke here”. Fuj takes in the crowd for a moment
before heading to the ring. Once in he sets his flag down and merely
stands in the corner, waiting for the bell. Caliber & Sebastian
converse for a moment before Sebastian heads out to ringside.
Finally, the ref Thomas Hall calls both Fuj & Caliber to the
center of the ring to explain the rules. Before the bell can ring,
Fuj extends a hand in a show of good sportsmanship. Naturally,
Caliber accepts it because they’re facebook besties, however, since
it’s before the bell, Caliber is the recipient of…
THE SALT IN THE EYE!
The bell rings as Caliber staggers
backwards, just as The Fuj clocks him in the face with a
bone-rattling right hook. From the ringside we hear Sebastian yell
“REMEMBER BLOODSPORT! DO WHAT VAN DAMME DID!”. Caliber is in such
pain that he can’t remember what JCVD did, he hopes it was scream,
because that’s what he did as Fuj stomped the hell out of him. He
picks up Caliber for a back suplex, and begins to do the Hollywood
Hogan style of choke. He picks up Caliber and throws him outside, in
order to stand in the ring and soak up the cheers, after having made
such light work of his opponent. Sebastian rushes to Caliber’s side
and begs him to get up, telling him to remember that line from Rocky
5 where Mick tells Rocky that the gloves will be like an angel on
your shoulder, screaming GET UP! Caliber makes it to his feet,
climbing up to the ropes where he’s greeted with a knee to the gut
and a short-cut back into the ring via a suplex. Fuj goes for the pin
but it only scores a two. Fuj goes for a neck vice, but Caliber
fights out of it only to catch a neckbreaker from Fuj, that again
only gets a two count. He places Caliber into the corner and whips
him into the other, taking full charge and crushing him into the
turnbuckle, causing him to collapse like a house of cards. Fuj thumps
his chest and screams at the hard camera “THIS GUY GETS IT!”. As
Fuj comes back to Caliber, who’s up to one knee, he doubles over as
Winfield strikes out with a shot to the gut. A European uppercut
follows as Caliber gets to his feet, followed by a short-arm
clothesline, taking Fuj down to the mat for the first time. Roll get
up gets a 1, so Caliber tries a german suplex that earns him a two
count. Irish whip off the ropes as Fuj ducks Caliber’s clothesline,
stops right behind him and bulldogs him to the ground. Fuj goes for a
double-under-hook suplex but Caliber elbows out, so instead Fuj gives
him an inverted DDT for his troubles. Fuj lays the boots to Caliber
before deciding to head to the top-rope. Once there he tries a flying
cross body that finds it’s target, only Caliber is able to roll Fuj
up for 2. Caliber then serves up some elbows in the corner before
snapmaring Fuj into the center of the ring. He hits a 2nd
rope splash before going for the pin, still only getting a two.
Sebastian grabs a chair and offers it to Caliber, only for Thomas to
tell him “Yeah fucking right” and makes Sebastian set it back
down, he does, but of course it’s within reach. While the ref is
distracted, Fuj unties the turnbuckle pads and sends Caliber crashing
into it with a slingshot, busting him wide open. Fuj sees to it an
all out effort to make it worse as he drops knees & elbows on the
laceration, covering himself in a good portion of Caliber’s blood. He
smears some on his chest as if to say “big fucking deal”. Back
up, a piledriver gets a 2 and a half, at which point Fuj is getting a
bit frustrated. At this point, he sets Caliber up for another King
Kong Bundy Avalanche, but as he’s about to take off, Dougie jumps the
rail and grabs his foot. Fuj turns around and delivers a boot to his
face, as the ref & security make sure he’s thrown out. With the
ref distracted, Caliber grabs the chair from Sebastian and tries to
take Fuj’s head off with it, instantly splitting him open. He runs
Fuj off the ropes and nails him with The Roaring Elbow, which Caliber
has loving dubbed The Roaring Boner. He pins the Fuj as the ref runs
in and counts ONE, TWO, THRE—but it’s not to be as Fuj throws his
shoulder up at the last second, causing Caliber to spit out an
endless stream of obscenities. He picks up Fuj and puts him back down
with a Scott Norton style powerbomb, and seals the deal with leg
drop. He pins Fuj in a cocky-manner by laying on him as if he were
watching TV and using Fuj as a pillow. The ref hits 2 just as Fuj
hooks Caliber’s arms with his own arm and leg, pulling Caliber over
into a pin. The crowd roars as the ref counts 2 and a half. Caliber
stands up, pissed off at almost losing in such a stupid way and lays
the boots again to Fuj. He sets Fuj up, like Warrior did to Macho at
WM7, and gets ready for another Roaring Boner, However, just before
he lands it The Fuj grabs the ref, and lets him absorb the blow,
sending all three to the mat. With the ref out, Caliber stands up and
waves his hand towards the back to get another. At this point,
Sebastian gets into the ring to offer up some help in leveling The
Fuj. First, Caliber places his foot on Fuj’s chest and has Sebastian
take a picture. He tells Sebastian to go get another chair so they
can preform a Con-Chair-To and end this blasted thing. He agrees and
runs to get one. Caliber slaps around the ref in order to make sure
he’s awake for the 3 count, and as he stands up to see if Sebastian’s
ready, he’s bind-sided as a chair comes and crushes his face.
Sebastian stands proudly over Caliber’s body, laughing to himself as
he levels a few more blows. Fuj stands up and asks for the mic, he
points to Sebastian “this guy gets it”, as Sebastian takes a bow
and leaves. Fuj knows Caliber is gone, but it isn’t good enough as he
drags him to the corner and executes a Shooting Star Leg Drop.
Pulling the ref over to the puddle of blood that was once Caliber,
Fuj puts one finger on his chest as the ref counts three.
A good chunk of the crowd
cheers as Fuj gives them the bird. He walks to the camera and states
“I told you, Keith, I’m your NUMBER. ONE. DRAW”

Me and Fuj, our feud wasn’t real. We put it on and thought it’d be funny if it lead to something ridiculous like this. So, please, try and prevent yourself from thinking this is legit or anything.

Blog Topic: Characters based on real life people or events

Hey Scott —
I thought this might be an interesting topic, especially for younger fans who may be aware of certain wrestling characters but unaware of the original inspiration for them.  Obviously wrestling has lots of characters based on general archetypes or occupations (garbage men, plumbers, tax men, etc.) but a fair amount have been inspired by real people and events or characters in popular fiction.

A few obvious ones that I can think of:
Cactus Jack:  Once known as Cactus Jack Manson, a gimmick that was chosen due to Foley's passing resemblance to cult leader Charles Manson.  I suppose the gimmick had some aping of Manson characteristics early on as well.
Sgt. Slaughter: As an Iraqi sympathizer in response the the incredibly high ratings for CNNs coverage of the 1990-1991 Gulf War / military conflict.
Magnum T.A.: Based upon the look and namesake of Tom Selleck's character Magnum P.I.
The Bolsheviks:  In reference to the Russian Revolution, but mostly just used to exploit ongoing tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States.
"Perstroika" Nikolai Volkoff:  Vince's way of reflecting the change in the relationship with the Soviet Union as well as its dissolution (via a face turn and teaming with Jim Duggan) and the falling of the Berlin Wall.
Vince McMahon:  Well, he must be based on a Roman Emperor like Caligula — with all the family in-fighting, potential for incest and insatiable appetite for power.
Two I have wondered about are Nikita Koloff and Berlyn.  

I assume Berlyn was supposed to be some sort of Holocaust denier, but was there anything specific in the news at the time that may have prompted that character?  Nikita Koloff I always assumed was just a generic Cold War villain, but was he actually based on a specific person?
Any others?

Berlyn came out of nowhere as far as inspiration that I can remember.  Koloff was just your standard evil Russian.  
A few more I can add off the top of my head:  "Simon Dean" was a rib on Dean Malenko (real name Dean Simon), and obviously Steven Richards as the leader of the RTC was a subtle comment on L. Brent Bozell.  There's tons of others because wrestling isn't known for its creativity and originality, generally speaking.  

I miss real tag team matches

Jericho posted a link to the classic Raw tag match with him/Benoit vs. HHH/Austin http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-SomfgOE0E&feature=youtube_gdata_player.  As I was watching, I just couldn't believe how fast paced it was compared to any style match these days.  Then I realized that because Vince hates tag teams, they haven't really put on a proper tag match in so long that they forgot why the formula has worked (and always will).  That the matches can be worked at a much higher pace where you can either hide the shortcomings of out of shape guys and still have fun matches that plays to each wrestler's strengths, or stick 4 talented guys in there and just light the building on fire like these guys did back in the day.
Evidence item # 4,278,321 as to how clueless Vince is in regards to product quality these days.

 

Well, there was the period a few years ago with Jericho/Show v. Batista/Rey that was really great precisely because they worked the formula like you're talking about.  It's becoming more of a problem of a self-fulfilling prophecy these days where Vince has no confidence in the tag teams, so they're emphasized less and given shorter matches, so people care about them less, so Vince has less confidence in them, and on and on.  

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle. 

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle. 

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle. 

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle. 

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle. 

Real Tuff

Don’t know if this is how to start a thread or not but, I’m figuring, if it’s interesting enough, you’ll get it to the right place. Anyway, I was reading some rather amusing posts about HBK and the Bulldog getting their ass handed to them by a bunch of Marines in New York and what “really” happened – One poster astutely pointed out there are no bases near there and it would’ve been a bunch of soldiers on leave that beat our boys up – One problem with that, who the fuck goes to upstate New York on leave? – The discussion started with who is a legitimate bad ass in wrestling – Some dumbshit mentioned Shawn for getting into a brawl with said Marines and the discussion devolved from there – A few intelligent people pointed out that Kurt Angle would probably kick ass on almost anybody (a belief that I hold) – Others mentioned Harley Race and Meng and a few others (for the record, I wouldn’t have wanted anything to do with Vern Gagne, Lou Thesz, Jack Brisco, Dory and Terry Funk, Danny Hodge, Rick and Scott Steiner and Stu Hart to name a few) – Some said that an MMA fighter’s training would be useless in a barfight because there are no rules – I have one question to ask them – What the Fuck??? They’ve obviously never been in a bar or any other fight; believe it or not, I’ve been in plenty of both and I find their remarks laughable – Skill counts for a lot – As does inherent toughness – Any asshole can put on a Tapout shirt  and take a few jujitsu classes and think he’s a fighter – Wrestle your whole life and then go learn submissions and how to strike – How many of you have really been into a real fight? Not many, from what I’ve read – Ain’t about being tough, it’s about not being afraid – So what do you think, Scott? Who’s really tough in the world of fake wrestling?

You got a bit ramble-y there but we’ll give it a go. UFC fighters abide by rules because they have to.  You can be damn sure that if a world-class martial artist wanted to make you scream in pain in a barfight, he’d just have to grab a finger and snap it.  Anyway, as for wrestling, Meng was always the guy with the best rep among wrestlers, although I don’t know that there was actual evidence behind that.  The shooters definitely knew how to take care of themselves, although these days there’s not the same paranoia so guys are seemingly unprepared in case of a shoot.  Just ask Bret Hart and Kurt Angle.