What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 15, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan do announce duties for today’s show, which kicks off a new round of television tapings in Huntington, West Virginia.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the taping took place on June 26.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – July 14, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are in the booth, and they are taped from Dayton, Ohio.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the taping took place on June 25 and attracted a crowd of 7,500 fans.  At the top of the broadcast, Ventura is confident that Hulk Hogan will announce his retirement.

Jake Roberts’ match against Paul Diamond from Prime Time Wrestling leads off the show.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 8, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, concluding the tapings in Rochester, New York.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Prime Time Wrestling – July 2, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the studio for tonight’s show.  Heenan wants Mr. Perfect’s feature match against Hercules to air at the beginning of the telecast, but Monsoon urges patience because the show is two hours long.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 1, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, and they are taped from Rochester, New York.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – June 30, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura commentate today’s action, still coming from Binghamton, New York.

Rick Rude’s squash from Prime Time Wrestling against Jim Powers is the first match.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – June 9, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura call the action and they are still in LaCrosse, Wisconsin.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – June 3, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth and they begin a new set of television tapings in Madison, Wisconsin.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the tapings took place on May 14.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – May 26, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura handle commentary, wrapping up a long television taping in Austin, Texas.

Jake Roberts’ squash from Prime Time Wrestling is shown.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – May 19, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are doing commentary, still taped from Austin, Texas.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Prime Time Wrestling – May 14, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the studio for tonight’s show.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – May 12, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura handle commentary today, taped from Austin, Texas.  This was the same location as the recent Saturday Night’s Main Event taping, taking place on April 23 and attracting 8,500 fans.

Read more

Mr. Perfect vs. Doink the Clown (and Other Dream Matches!)

King of the Ring (1993) - Wikipedia

WWF KING OF THE RING QUALIFYING MATCHES (1993):
* So for this week’s “Dream Matches” column, I decided randomly to take a look at the build up to 1993’s inaugural King of the Ring. As a 12-year old fan, I was way into the idea of this big tournament, and even now the set-up seems great- you have an 8-man tournament in one night on PPV, and in the weeks leading up to the show, you stick your stars up against JTTS guys in “Qualifying Matches” that are mostly foregone conclusions, except a couple of them have a legit question mark. It lets your “Featured Matches” actually count for something, and gives your name guys a big win on TV- and if you were watching back then, you know you only saw “Star vs. Star” matches once per week if you were lucky. I’ll see what I can find on YouTube for these (turns out it’s everything but Shawn/Crush, which ended in a Double Count-Out, which disqualified BOTH for some reason, so we had a different Qualifying Match instead).

The issue with KOTRs, of course, is that with 16 guys, 15 have to do the job. And when times are tough, Vince is squirrelly about letting guys drop legit falls. The real purpose of the first King of the Ring, of course, was to return some credibility to former champion Bret Hart, and set off his new feud with Jerry Lawler.

RAZOR RAMON vs. “EL MATADOR” TITO SANTANA:
* So Razor had debuted the previous year and been given arguably his biggest solo push ever, teaming with Ric Flair in the main program at Survivor Series and then facing Bret Hart for the WWF Title at the Royal Rumble. After his loss there, he was cycled into the upper-midcard, beating Bob Backlund at WMIX. Here, we’re a little bit away from the face turn that would forever change his career. Santana, meanwhile, has fallen all the way down the card and is only rarely featured on TV anymore- he’s been a JTTS for years by this point, and was looking pretty flabby compared to the ’80s. Both guys are in black, here- I don’t recall Tito in that look.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – May 6, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, and they are wrapping up the television tapings in Syracuse, New York.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – May 5, 1990

Vince McMahon calls today’s action with Jesse Ventura.  This is the last show of the taping cycle in Glen Falls, New York.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – April 29, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan call today’s action, still taped from Syracuse, New York.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: Saturday Night’s Main Event XXVI

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura handle commentary and they are taped from Austin, Texas.  To put over the Texas setting of the show, McMahon and Ventura open the show on horseback in the aisle.  The card was hyped as “The Tussle in Texas” and took place on April 23.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew a crowd of 8,500 fans.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: WWF Prime Time Wrestling – April 16, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan host tonight’s broadcast.

Jake Roberts’ squash from Wrestling Challenge airs.

Read more

What the World Was Watching: The Wrestling Summit (Special Column)

As noted in prior columns, this show was a joint effort by the WWF, New Japan Pro Wrestling, and All Japan Pro Wrestling.  The WWF was looking to expand its global presence while New Japan and All Japan felt threatened by Akira Maeda’s shoot-like Universal Wrestling Federation, which drew a 50,000 person crowd to the Tokyo Dome for a big show in November 1989.  To counter them, New Japan and All Japan worked together on a supershow at the Tokyo Dome on February 10.  Then, they built on that effort by partnering with the WWF for another big card in Tokyo on April 13 that was named The Wrestling Summit.  According tothehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew a crowd of 53,742.

Read more