History of the Jobber


Hi Scott,


I just read on Wiki that essentially Johnny Rodz was basically the first jobber in History. How accurate is that? What is the history of Jobbers?

Happy Memorial Day or Whatever it is you freaky peace-nik Cannucks celebrate.

​We throw rocks at veterans because we're Bizarroland.  
I guess it depends how you define a jobber, but there certainly were guys who were basically tomato cans even in the Goldust Trio era.  It's a tough designation because there was no TV and so there was little need for squash matches.  I'll tweet the question to Karl Stern, because that's the kind of thing he'd probably love to cover on his show.  ​

New E-Book: History of Saturday Night’s Main Event

One of the most common complaints wrestling fans have today is how
much content there is to watch.  WWE alone has at least seven hours of
wrestling TV a week.  For over twenty years, we’ve gotten used to
wrestling airing every Monday night with some of the biggest stars in
the sport squaring off.  However, things weren’t always the same.  Back
in the 1980’s, wrestling television was based around the idea of squash
matches.  Most shows featured a big name against an unknown and matches
against other stars were almost unheard of.

Things began to change in 1985.  Powered by the strength of
Wrestlemania and Hulkamania, the WWF was able to air a series of
specials on NBC, featuring matches between big name stars and even title
matches, all for free.  The shows were major successes and helped push
the company into their golden era, sending professional wrestling to
heights no one had ever seen possible.

In this book, I’ll be looking at all thirty six episodes of the
series, as well as the five Main Event specials, breaking down every
match, segment and show as a whole.  As usual I’ll be providing play by
play, historical context and analysis of every show.

The books runs over 300 pages on a Kindle and only costs $3.99, or
the equivalent in other currencies. If you don’t have a Kindle or e-book
reader, there are several FREE apps you can use to read it on pretty much any electronic device. You can find those from Amazon here.

You can pick up the book from Amazon here.

From the UK Amazon here.

From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search
“KB’ Saturday” and my book will be the first thing that pop up.

Also you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE
Championship, Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from
1995-97, In Your House, Summerslam, Starrcade, ECW Pay Per Views, Royal
Rumble and Clash of the Champions at my author’s page here.

I hope you like it and shoot me any questions you might have.

Thomas Hall

New E-Book: History of the Royal Rumble

Back in late 1987, the WWF started messing with the NWA’s pay per view
schedule by airing Survivor Series 1987 on the same night as Starrcade
1987. This worked so well that they decided to do it again in January
1988 but as a free special on the USA network. Nearly thirty years
later, the show has become one of the biggest events of the year and
contains one of the most important matches on the Road to Wrestlemania:
the Royal Rumble.

For twenty seven years, the Royal
Rumble has given us the biggest battle royal of the year and some of the
best matches of all time. Ranging from Chris Jericho vs. Chris Benoit
in a ladder match to Triple H vs. Cactus Jack in a street fight to Chris
Benoit vs. Kurt Angle in a technical masterpiece, you’re almost
guaranteed to get a solid title match in addition to the Royal Rumble
itself.

In this book, we’ll look at every edition of the Royal
Rumble starting in 1988 and break down every show, segment and match as
WWE starts their Road to Wrestlemania. The book contains twenty seven
pay per view reviews and looks at everything that has taken place at the
first major show of the year on the WWE calendar. As usual I’ll be
providing play by play, historical context and analysis of every show.

The
books runs about 350 pages on a Kindle and only costs $3.99, or the
equivalent in other currencies. If you don’t have a Kindle or e-book
reader, there are several FREE apps you can use to read it on pretty much any electronic device. You can find those from Amazon here.

You can pick up the book from Amazon here.

From the UK Amazon here.

From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search KB Rumble and my book will be the first thing that pop up.

Also
you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE Championship,
Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from 1995-97, In Your
House, Summerslam, Starrcade, ECW Pay Per Views and Clash of the
Champions at my author’s page here.

I hope you like it and shoot me any questions you might have.

Thomas Hall

ECW’s importance in wrestling history

Scott,

It's been 13 years since ECW folded, and about 17 years since they were really relevant in the world of wrestling. 

I know you'd watched ECW from the mid-90's to the end so I thought I would ask what you think of ECW as a whole all these years later?

Do the big matches and angles still hold up? Do you see the whole thing as more of a fad that people got tired of quickly?
​It was mostly a fad that I got tired of quickly.  I can barely watch the early 90s stuff now, it just seems so embarrassingly low rent and amateurish.  That was part of the charm at the time, but the Attitude Era WWF stuff took that formula and really blew them out of the water.  Some of the matches still hold up and it's a nice change when I'm watching stuff like the Unreleased DVD sets because it is so different than the current homogenized product.  But overall its influence is pretty much limited to the 93-96 run because the ECW product goes off a cliff at that point, business wise and creatively.  IN MY OPINION, haters.  ​

New E-Book: KB’s History of Monday Nitro Volume II

We’re going back
to the 90s again for a look at the second full year of Monday Nitro.
The previous year closed out with WCW on a hot streak but things
would pick up even more in the coming year. WCW would go on a run
that had the WWF and Monday Night Raw not only on the ropes but on
the brink of death.

Over the course of the year, Nitro was must see TV with action,
drama, violence and the NWO running roughshod all over WCW. The
stories were as compelling as ever and made you want to come back the
next week to see what was going to happen. In addition to the top
story, 1997 also saw the rise of the future with stars such as Rey
Mysterio Jr., Chris Jericho, Chris Benoit, Dean Malenko and Goldberg
becoming some of the most interesting parts of the show.

In this book, we’ll look at every episode of Monday Nitro from
1997 and see why they were so unstoppable all year. Each show is
broken down segment by segment and match by match with historical
context, ratings and analysis of what worked or didn’t work about
each segment and how the shows added up to being so successful for
WCW.

The books runs over 400 pages on a Kindle and only costs $3.99, or
the equivalent in other currencies. If you don’t have a Kindle or
e-book reader, there are several FREE apps you can use to read it on
pretty much any electronic device. You can find those from Amazon
here.

You can pick up the book from Amazon here.

From the UK Amazon here.

From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just
search KB History of Monday Nitro and my books will be the first
things that pop up.

Also you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE
Championship, Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from
1995-96, In Your House, Summerslam, Starrcade, ECW Pay Per Views and
Clash of the Champions at my author’s page here.

I hope you like it and shoot me any questions you might have.

Thomas Hall

QOTD #37: Changing History

Today’s Question:
If you could change one
match result from wrestling history, which would it be, and why?
We’ll get into the nitty gritty of that tomorrow. Start the
discussion right away by scrolling to the end of this. Otherwise, stick around
to talk about the ladies.

Yesterday, I asked you about the best women’s match you ever
saw? The responses varied from the WWE crowd, to the International crowd, as
you’d expect. Here’s what you said…
jobber123: Sasha Grey vs Bree Olson
Last I heard, Charlie Sheen was winning.
James: Lita vs.Trish Stratus, the match that main
evented Raw in 2004.
MrJustinB: Trish vs Lita, for Trish’s retirement is a
long time favorite of mine.
Lots of love for the Trish / Lita series that dominated the
WWE’s ladies division for nearly 5 years. Lita was always a little sloppy, but
Trish was a ring general who was able to keep it contained – and what resulted
was the absolute pinnacle of women’s wrestling on the mainstream circuit.
WILLYOUSTOP?!?: Jumping Bomb Angels v. Glamour Girls from
Royal Rumble ’88 for a North American match.
This one was brought up tons throughout the comments; and if
you’ve never seen it, you’re missing out on something special. The fact that
Vince didn’t see money in these ladies, and build the entire division around
them is a travesty.
DJ Sprite: As great as the Lita/Trish matches were,
Lita vs. Stephanie McMahon in the main event of raw is the greatest. Rock as
the special ref. Interference from Austin and HHH, the hardy boyz, and the pop
when Lita won. First time women ever main evented raw and they stole the damn
show.
This was actually a big, big deal at the time. It was obviously
a ballsy move to put the women in the main event of RAW when they still had WCW
on the other channel, though the blow was softened by having Rocky and Hunter
hanging around. The fans were absolutely rabid, and as noted, the pop was
incredible. Really made the division feel special again, even for a minute.
ONITA100: Megumi Kudo vs. Combat Toyoda (No Rope
Electrified Barbed Wire Match) From 1996, been my favorite womens match since I
first saw it in the late 90’s on a bootleg tape, so I doubt anything I will see
even in the future will top it. Absolutely brutal match that is LOADED with
emotion. Just wild. They both busted their asses to a level you wont ever see a
diva reach. The chemistry between them is great, and their matches always have
that Sting/Vader vibe. And for note, the sacrifice spot at 25:55 in the vid I
posted is one of my favorite spots ever

Holy … shit. That was a little uncomfortable to watch. I
think I’m part of the macho boat who never wants to see the women *really* get
their asses kicked, and this was a lot to watch. Great match, but I don’t think
I could do it again.
Eric Von Erich: Dynamite Kansai & Mayumi Ozaki &
Cuty Suzuki & Hikari Fukuoka (JWP team) vs. Aja Kong & Kyoko Inoue
& Takako Inoue & Sakie Hasegawa (AJW team) from 7/31/93. It starts off
with the “first attack,” which is four separate five-minute singles
matches. There are no “winners” in these singles matches. If you beat
your opponent your team gets a point and you keep wrestling until the five
minutes are up. After the first attack, it turns into an 8 woman ironman-rules
tag match. The team with the most points at the end of 60:00 is declared the
winner. Great action throughout and perfect booking of the falls. It’s a unique
format that I wish WWE would use for a PPV main event.
Bud, you lost me just explaining the rules. If I need it
written down, and a math teacher standing over my shoulder taking me through
what’s going on, it’s probably too much for me. But, we’ll let the readers
decide.
joedust: Micke James v. Trish Stratus is probably the
best women’s match of this era. It had a very strong angle leading into it and
the match was awesome. Mickie James in particular exclled in her role, and the
crowd gave her a babyface reaction when she won. I always loved that they
thought that Micke’s unwanted advances towards Trish would make Mickie a heel.
TONS of love from the board here. The angle was perfect. A
couple years earlier, they had tried to create the creepy stalker angle against
Trish with Victoria, and while it worked, they outdid themselves here. The
not-so-secretly in love with Trish Stratus Mickie James played her role to
perfection. And after months of subtle, and not so subtle advances, it all
plays out on the biggest stage of them all with the mock cunnilingus in the
middle of a hard fought, excellent match. Of course, this is the same company
that didn’t try to hide Edge’s boner the following year during his live sex
celebration – so class wasn’t exactly a top priority for the WWE a decade ago.
Elmo Machete: Not the “best” by any means, but
my favorite is probably Trish/Steph. It took everybody by surprise and had NO
reason to be as good as it was. That neckbreaker from Regal was siiick.
We’ve covered this at least two other times in QOTD
previously, but yes, this really left everyone in shock. I think we all expected
the usual ladies catfight, and we wound up with a pretty good brawl.
TheQatarian: Another in the “not necessarily the
best, but certainly different” department: the Ivory/Tori hardcore match
from a late-night Raw. This match had a little fire and hatred to it, which is
something that has always generally been lacking in the women’s division.
Sadly, the feud didn’t go anywhere.
Michael Weyer: Victoria vs Trish, Survivor’s Series 2002 as
they just beat the hell out of each other in a fun brawl.
Survivor Series 2002 is probably the PPV I’ve found has the
most rewatchability over the last 10 years, because every match hits the point.
Trish and Victoria was outstanding, as Trish was completely in the groove by
this point making everyone look good except Jackie Gayda. Another great choice.
It’s nice to remember that the women don’t always bring the
drek, and that there are a number of really talented women out there who take
your entertainment very seriously. Thanks for everyone’s participation in the
thread today. Enjoy your Sunday, and I’ll be back tomorrow.

New E-Book: KB’s History of ECW Pay Per Views

We’re going back to the 90s this time as we take a look at the twenty one original ECW pay per views. The company was the kind of independent wrestling at the time and reaching a national audience was the next step. The solution was to get on pay per view, and that’s exactly what ECW did.

Over the nearly four years that ECW was on pay per view, they went on a long ride, ranging from good to bad and then back up again. You can see the Monday Night Wars and talent raids take their toll, as a huge cast of characters comes and goes through ECW’s doors. This series sees everything from barbed wire, flaming tables, chairs, some absolutely amazing cruiserweight style matches and a host of names that would fill up the WWE and TNA rosters for years to come.

In this new e-book, I’ll be looking back at all twenty one ECW pay per views and breaking each one down match by match and segment by segment, providing historical context, analysis and rating each match and show. These are ALL new reviews, done over the last two months and not released before.

The book runs over 280 pages on Kindle. If you don’t have a Kindle or e-book reader, there are several FREE apps you can use to read it on pretty much any electronic device.

You can find those from Amazon here.

You can pick up the book from Amazon here.

 From the UK Amazon here.

 From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search KB History of ECW and it should be the first thing that pops up.

Also you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE Championship, Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from 1995-96, In Your House, Summerslam, Starrcade and Clash of the Champions at my author’s page here.

I hope you like it and shoot me any questions you might have.

Mike Tyson changing the history of pro wrestling


Think the blog would like this trip down memory lane, looking at how Mike Tyson vs. Hulk Hogan almost happened & what happened when it didn't.

http://stholeary.blogspot.com/2014/06/how-buster-douglas-changed-history-of.html

​I've heard that one about Savage getting the World title in 1990 before and to this day I'm really skeptical about it.  I just don't think Vince was as serious about apparently switching the main event to Hogan/Tyson and Warrior/Savage as it's portrayed.  ​

New E-Book: KB’s History of Survivor Series

This time we’re starting back in 1987 when there was only one WWF pay
per view a year.  With Wrestlemania III being a huge success, it was
decided that another pay per view should be added to help bridge the gap
between Wrestlemanias.  The fact that it was able to cause major damage
to the NWA was just a bonus.

There has been a long list of great Survivor Series matches over the
years, including the tag team Survivor Series matches, Bret Hart vs.
Shawn Michaels in 1992 and Steve Austin vs. Bret Hart. There’s also a
big list of people making their debut with the company at the show.
Names like the Undertaker, Kurt Angle and The Rock all stepped into the
ring for the first time at Survivor Series. On top of all that Survivor
Series had the most infamous moment in wrestling history that changed a
lot of things forever.

In this new book, I’ll be looking at the history of the Survivor
Series, breaking down each show and going over every match, promo and
segment, providing historical context, analysis and rating each match
and show.

The book is available from Amazon for just $3.99 (or the equivalent
in any other currency) and runs 391 pages on a Kindle. If you don’t have
a Kindle, there are free apps that you can get to read it on your
phone, laptop, iPad, or any other electronic device you have. These can
be found from Amazon here.

You can pick it up from Amazon here.

From the UK Amazon here.

From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search
KB Survivor Series and it should be the first thing that pops up.

Also you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE
Championship, Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from
1995-96, In Your House, Summerslam, Starrcade and Clash of the Champions
at my author’s page here.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for checking it out.

Thomas Hall

New E-Book: KB’s History Of Clash Of The Champions

We’re going back to the 80s again with the original WCW prime time
special. Starting in March of 1988, the NWA launched the Clash of the
Champions to mess with Wrestlemania IV. The idea worked so they decided
to keep things going and made more editions of the show. Over the
course of nearly ten years, thirty five Clash of the Champions specials
were produced with some of the best matches WCW ever had included.

In this new book, I go back and look at every single show, breaking each
one down match by match and segment by segment with detailed analysis
and a look through the history of the series.

The book is available from Amazon for just $3.99 and runs 354 pages on a
Kindle. If you don’t have a Kindle, there are free apps that you can
get to read it on your phone, laptop, iPad, or any other electronic
device you have. These can be found from Amazon here.

You can pick it up from Amazon here.

From the UK Amazon here.

From the Canadian Amazon here.

Or if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search KB Clash and it should be the first thing that pops up.

Also you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE Championship,
Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from 1995-96, In Your
House, Summerslam and Starrcade at my author’s page here.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for checking it out.

KB

QOTD 116: A Brief History of the IWC.

I leave you guys alone for one day!

One. Day.

Yeesh. I had an 8 paragraph QOTD about the post-modern sexualization of women ready to go, with footnotes and everything, and YOU all had to drag us down through the mud of in fighting, making fun, and internet wrestling drama!

How fun!

So, I figured what we could do here is call upon our veterans to explain to us perhaps the history of the IWC, and speak to the history of the BOD, how you found it, former personalities, and past drama to the relative newbies such as myself who caught on in the 411mania era.

Thus:

Give a brief history of the IWC – What was the ‘big’ site when it all started? what the eff is a RSPWFAQ? Seriously! How do you feel toward the IWC ‘community’ in general? Is it a work? 

I’ll phrase it like a 5th grade reading book comprehension question.

Discuss: Summarize the history of the Internet Wrestling Community. What events, characters, and unexpected happenings deserve to be highlighted? Make a top 5 list of your favorite. 






I kind of came to the whole thing through Extreme Warfare 9000 – which I think I’ve mentioned. I found that, found the forums, found the previews written by various “IWC” personalities, googled “Scott Keith” from there, and bam I think I’m checking this site regularly around 2005. I think.

I think a little internet drama and ballbusting can be fun. It’s fun to be a bit of a dick, it’s fun to troll or anti-troll or do things that are deliberately annoying but ultimately harmless, sort of like an internet whoopee cushion. See also: Otters, Blog.

Beyond that, I don’t know much about the whole history, the big stories, big leaks, big writers, and so on. Naturally that probably begins and ends with the Torch or Figure 4. Whichever is the more popular one. I don’t know.

I just tried to find the old EWR diaries with Bossman and I guess they’re lost to the nethers. How sad.

History of the WWE DVD

I figured I should catch up on some of the WWE stuff on Netflix in case it gets pulled at the end of the month, and my starting point was the promising History of the WWE documentary.  Watching it free on Netflix is actually the better way to go, because the match selection on the DVD is ridiculously weak, to say the least.  
I will say that the documentary is totally justified by the first 30 minutes, because I sat there in rapt fascination listening to the parade of old stars talking about Vince Sr. and working MSG in the old days and how the company worked in the 60s and 70s.  George Steele and Stan Hansen doing an interview in their normal speaking voices?  Greg Valentine still looking like he's 30 years old?  GIVE ME MORE.  This is what I wanted out of the piece and I would have sat through two hours of nothing but that.  
From there it becomes the usual WWE perspective — things were great in the 70s, but then got even better in the 80s, but man, did they ever get awesome in the 90s after one rogue doctor single-handedly tried to bring down the company via the steroid trials and blah blah blah.  Honestly, the Hulkamania / Attitude / Monday Night Wars stuff is nothing that hasn't been covered in a dozen other DVD releases.  They do talk about Owen Hart's death in as much as it's related to how bad it made Stephanie and Linda feel while they were watching it, but Benoit and Eddie aren't mentioned at all.  And then at the 90 minute mark it literally turns into a PR film for how awesome the PG era is and I had to shut it off because my eyes were going to roll right out of their sockets.  I was even pretty forgiving of the laughable hypocrisy towards stuff like the steroid trials and killing off the territories up until then, just because it's stuff that's not usually covered in these.  
Anyway, the Capital Wrestling portions are well worth watching and dammit I wish they just did a DVD called "A bunch of old-timers bullshitting about the 60s and 70s and here's some classic matches we haven't aired on a million other DVDs" because I'd buy that shit for $29.95 with a smile on my face. If you haven't already watched the multiple Death of WCW/History of the NWO/Attitude Era/Monday Night Wars documentaries, the rest is also worth checking out, but if you're like me you'll probably get bored by the time they're talking about what a GREAT IDEA the brand extension was and how John Cena would be languishing in the indies without the opportunity that it presented and such.  
Mildly recommended.

Stranger Things Presents: The Greatest Poll in BoD History

The 2014 Royal Rumble is almost upon us, which means we will all soon be looking past that event and watching what will unfold on The Road to WrestleMania. That also means that another month will be here, and the BoD’s monthly feature called The Greatest PPV Matches in (insert month here). I have decided to make this list somewhat interactive, and give you, the BoD Universe, the opportunity to influence my decision-making, by means other than pitchforks and torches, and switchblades and other weapons of influence.

I present to you……the poll. A most diplomatic way to pick a front-runner. The BoD will pick the greatest match in February PPV history, and I will honor that choice. The remaining Top 5 will be decided by myself through study, review and science. The nominees:

What is the greatest match in February PPV history?
Ricky Steamboat vs. Ric Flair – Chi-Town Rumble
Steve Austin vs. Triple H – No Way Out 2001
Jushin Liger vs. Brian Pillman – SuperBrawl II
Bret Hart vs. The Undertaker vs. Vader vs. Steve Austin – In Your House: Final Four
Cactus Jack vs. Triple H – No Way Out 2000
The Rock vs. Kurt Angle – No Way Out 2001
Eddie Guerrero vs. Brock Lesnar – No Way Out 2004
Sting/Pillman/Steiners vs. Flair/Zbyszko/Windham/Sid – Wargames – WrestleWar 91
Lex Luger vs. Ric Flair – WrestleWar 90
HBK vs. Jericho vs. Triple H vs. J. Hardy vs. JBL vs. Umaga – Elimination Chamber – No Way Out 2008
pollcode.com free polls

Choose wisely.

New E-Book: KB’s History of Summerslam

It’s the biggest party of the Summer and one of the best series of
wrestling shows ever.  Summerslam started in 1988 and has gone on to
give us some of the best matches in WWE history.  It began as little
more than a way to bridge the gap from Wrestlemania to the new Survivor
Series pay per view but soon took on a life of its own.

Over the
years there were such classics as Shawn Michaels vs. Razor Ramon in a
ladder match, Bret Hart vs. Mr. Perfect, The Rock vs. HHH in a ladder
match, the first ever TLC match, Triple H vs. Shawn Michaels, John Cena
vs. CM Punk, Undertaker vs. Edge inside the Cell, Batista vs. John Cena,
CM Punk vs. Brock Lesnar and John Cena vs. Daniel Bryan.  The show was
often a launching pad for new stars with Rock and HHH in particular
going from midcard sensations to the top of the company.

In this
new e-book, I look back at every edition of the show, breaking down each
match, segment and show as a whole, providing analysis, history and my
thoughts on why everything either worked or didn’t work.

The book is available from Amazon for just $4 and runs 350 pages on a Kindle.

You can pick it up from Amazon here.

If you’re in the UK, you can pick it up here.

If you’re in Canada, you can pick it up here.

Or
if you’re in another country with its own Amazon page, just search KB’s
History of Summerslam and it should be the only thing that pops up.

Also
you can still get any of my previous books on the WWE Championship,
Monday Night Raw from 1998 and 2001, Monday Nitro from 1995-96, In Your
House and Starrcade at my author’s page here.

If you don’t have a Kindle, there are free
apps that you can get to read it on your phone, laptop, iPad, or any
other electronic device you have.  These can be found from Amazon here.

I hope you enjoy it and thanks for checking it out.

Tommy Hall

Battleground (Probably) Lowest Buyrate In History

I'm not sure if the article is behind the paid firewall or not, but looks like Battleground did around 110K-125K worldwide buys, which would make it the biggest flop in WWE PPV history, with the exception of the ECW December to Dismember disaster.  
So clearly, Abeyance = NOT A DRAW.
Although then Hell in a Cell appears to be up from last year, so maybe he is.  

New E-Book: KB’s History of In Your House

                                                    

inyourhousesofaredits23_zps3ef6c882
My newest book is pretty self-explanatory. It’s the complete history of In Your House, a WWF pay per view series that ran from May 1995 to April 1999. The series covers most of the New Generation and the first half of the Attitude Era and everything in between. There are some absolute masterpieces included in this series, ranging from the first Hell in a Cell to Canadian Stampede to Austin vs. Dude Love II to Shawn vs. Mankind and many others.

Also included is a look back at the story that kept the company afloat when WCW’s boot was over the WWF’s throat: the Border War. The majority of the story took place at In Your House, including the final blowoff in Calgary. There’s also a good portion of the most famous feud of all time with the corporate Vince McMahon trying to suppress the rebellion being waged by Stone Cold Steve Austin. The feud defined the Attitude Era and carried the company to heights never believed possible.

In Your House was one of the most important pay per view series of all time and features some of the most important matches in the company’s history. This new book looks at every single show in the series and includes detailed history and analysis of each show, broken down match by match and segment by segment. The book runs about 320 pages on a Kindle or about 170 single spaced pages in Word.

The book is available from Amazon for just $4 and can be picked up in any country that has Amazon.

It can be found at the American Amazon here.

At the UK Amazon here.

And at the Canadian Amazon here.

If you’re in another country and would like to pick it up, just search “KB’s In Your House” and it should be the first thing that pops up.

If you don’t have a Kindle or E-Reader, there are 100% free apps that can be downloaded from Amazon, found here.

Please check it out and I hope you enjoy it.

Cucch’s Book Review: “The Unauthorized History of D-Generation X.”

This book actively does two things. I will let you guess them….

No one will ever dispute that Degeneration X was one of the most influential pairings in the history of pro wrestling. Shawn Michaels and Triple H made a weekly mockery of kayfabe, and an entire generation loves them for it. The troop was truly revolutionary, and they made it a habit to push all boundaries of wrestling sanity with each weekly promo, match, promo, backstage skit, promo, and occasional five star classic match.  DX was truly an influential act that helped to modernize this business.

Yet the troupe is mostly hated and despised by the industry. Why is that?

Well, it is simply this: Shawn Michaels and Paul “HHH” Levesque are among the two most detestable individuals the WWE/F has ever produced. Sure, I am absolutely certain they have their fans, as all wrestlers do. But riddle me this: how many WWE athletes, over the last 25 or so years, have produced enough vitriol to make a new vitamin supplement for baseball players to get hopped up on?

Michaels. HHH. And that is it.

Sure, some hate Bret Hart and his knee high schoolgirl ways. Some hate Hogan. The less said there, the better. But HHH and HBK generally invoke a level of hatred from a good number of wrestling fans that make the late Osama Bin Laden look quite like Bob Backlund. It is really amazing when one ponders all of the surrounding facts.

Well, here are the facts. Let me being with this: I am a HUGE Bret Hart fan. Thus, I hate Shawn Michaels. There, now you have it. At this point, one must be thinking, “Man, he hates HBK and loves Hitman…where is this review going to go?” I will always remain a huge Hitman fan and detractor of HBK. While I have prided myself on how great Bret’s biography is, and I have always prided myself on not being subjective or biased, I can sum up this book in a few words:

Total shit.

Yup. First off, it is supposed to be the words of the REAL DX members, HBK, HHH, Chyna and Rick Rude. Rude is dead, Chyna is….somewhere in her own world, HHH is now a McMahon and HBK blows, or has blown, all of them. What…expecting a level of discourse of objectivity? Ah…no. HBK was Vince’s blowjob boy, as far as this writer is concerned, and he parlayed that spectacular head into a job for his boy toy…I mean friend…HHH.

Now, most books feature in depth analysis and some behind the scenes stories. This book is total kayfabe for the most part. HHH OCCASIONALLY drops something…but not much. HBK never says shit. So, while it is a quick, easy read, it is not a volume that is going to grant you a shitload of wrestling knowledge. Sure, Shawn mentions he was, while not totally wrong, but felt in the wrong about Montreal, you are going to get equal bullflop from his H-Ness about how Foley never put him over. Except that one time. Or second time. Nope. Almost nothing.

This is not this kid’s best review. I realize that. But realize that THIS is not the best book. It is more or less KAYFABE to the fullest, and, unless you are like me, someone who craves any and all information, it is not for you. For the few who want to read through several layers of horseshit, who want to realize that HHH and HBK are two assholes who are so full of shit that terds spout out everytime they open their mouths…maybe you might enjoy this…