What the World Was Watching: ECW Hardcore TV – October 31, 1995

Beulah McGillicutty promises “an up close and personal feel” and talks about TNT.  This gives way to Steve Austin doing an Eric Bischoff impression on Monday Nitro, talking about his joy in firing people over the phone.  Austin calls WCW’s talent old and their show “Monday Nyquil” where “the big boys play with each other.”

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What the World Was Watching: ECW: Gangstas Paradise

Joey Styles commentates the matches, which come from the ECW Arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 16.

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What the World Was Watching: ECW Heatwave ’95

Joey Styles does commentary for the show, which took place at the ECW Arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 15.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew 1,000 fans.

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What the World Was Watching: ECW: Hardcore Heaven ’95

Joey Styles does the commentary from the ECW Arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The show took place on July 1, 1995 and, according to Dave Meltzer’s Wrestling Observer for June 10, it drew a crowd of 1,075.

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What the World Was Watching: ECW Hardcore TV – January 3, 1995

While the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) and World Championship Wrestling (WCW) were locked in a fight for national supremacy for much of 1995, a renegade promotion based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania built a cult-like following.  Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) relished challenging wrestling’s norms and conventions.  When Jim Crockett sought to revive the prestige of the NWA World Heavyweight Championship in 1994, ECW star Shane Douglas threw the title on the canvas in disgust after winning it in a tournament final against 2 Cold Scorpio.  While the WWF tried to tone down violence in its product by not allowing the use of chairs or ladders as weapons, ECW encouraged its brawlers to put each other through tables and use weapons liberally.  And whereas WCW sought to take wrestling back to the 1980s with a revival of Hulkamania, ECW’s owner and booker Paul Heyman – known at this time by his television name Paul E. Dangerously –  tapped into the 1990s Jerry Springer-like zeitgeist with risqué storylines and promos that featured colorful language.

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