What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 15, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan do announce duties for today’s show, which kicks off a new round of television tapings in Huntington, West Virginia.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the taping took place on June 26.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – July 14, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are in the booth, and they are taped from Dayton, Ohio.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the taping took place on June 25 and attracted a crowd of 7,500 fans.  At the top of the broadcast, Ventura is confident that Hulk Hogan will announce his retirement.

Jake Roberts’ match against Paul Diamond from Prime Time Wrestling leads off the show.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 8, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, concluding the tapings in Rochester, New York.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – July 7, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura call today’s action, wrapping up the television taping cycle in Binghamton, New York.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – July 1, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, and they are taped from Rochester, New York.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – June 30, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura commentate today’s action, still coming from Binghamton, New York.

Rick Rude’s squash from Prime Time Wrestling against Jim Powers is the first match.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – June 23, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura start a new round of summer television tapings in Binghampton, New York.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, these tapings took place on June 6.

Brutus Beefcake’s squash from Prime Time Wrestling starts the show.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Prime Time Wrestling – June 11, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the studio for this evening’s show, with Monsoon in a dour mood because of Hulk Hogan’s condition.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – June 3, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth and they begin a new set of television tapings in Madison, Wisconsin.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the tapings took place on May 14.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – May 20, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are in the booth, still broadcasting from San Antonio, Texas.  In a funny opening bit, Heenan thinks Monsoon is talking about Tito Santana when Monsoon references former Mexican general Santa Anna.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – May 19, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are doing commentary, still taped from Austin, Texas.

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The No-Limit Soldiers vs. Brian Knobbs, Hugh Morrus & Jerry Flynn (and other Dream Matches!)

WCW 4 Ever on Twitter: "The No Limit Soldiers #WCW… "

Quoth the No-Limit Soldiers: “Hoody Hoo!”

Welcome back to another edition of wrestling’s weirdest Dream Matches! This time I have one of the most all-time “WTF?” trios matches ever, as we end up with the First Family- a band of WCW’s weakest heel JTTS guys at this point- up against the infamous No-Limit Soldiers, long after their run was dying. So it’s a true dream team of Brian Knobbs, Hugh Morrus and friggin’ LIGHTNING FOOT against Brad Armstrong and two never-was roid-monsters in 4×4 and Swoll.

Also on the docket, we have WWF Champion “Macho Man” Randy Savage vs. Akeem in Versailles Stadium in France! Rocker Shawn Michaels taking on Demolition Crush in 1991- a bout that would look incredibly different only two years later and was on PPV in ’94! The Diamond Studd takes on P.N. News in his infamous “rapper” gimmick! And finally, a trip to 2011 WWE as Kevin Nash takes on Santino Marella.

THE NO LIMIT SOLDIERS (B.A., 4×4 & Swoll) vs. THE FIRST FAMILY (Brian Knobbs, Hugh Morrus & “LIGHTNING FOOT” Jerry Flynn, w/ Jimmy Hart):
(WCW Saturday Night, 09 11 1999)
* OH MY SWEET DEAR JESUS, YES!! THIS kind of bullshit nonsense is the entire reason I started this column in the first place! Look at these idiots- a fat sack of ass in Knobbs, never-was Hugh Morrus and of course LIGHTNING FOOT the super-jobber going up against one of WCW’s worst ideas, comprised of whatever guys they were paying but weren’t doing anything with. B.A. is Brad Armstrong, fresh from the jobber corps. Swoll is somewhat infamous for only ever doing anything in this angle (his wrestling career consists of AWA & New Japan in 1991 and WCW in 1999 and that’s it)- I do love how he’s called “Swoll”, which none of the announcers (Tony, Bobby, Larry & Mike being the four Caucasianiest Caucasians to ever live) explaining what the hell that name meant. 4×4 is an absolute BLIMP, looking like a legit Looney Tunes caricature of a roughneck, and didn’t make it more than a year in the business either, acting as a bodyguard for Harlem Heat 2000. This stems from a brawl last Saturday Night, and is a revenge bout between the two stables. The faces are all in camo gear while the First Family is in black (with Knobbs sporting a PINK SHIRT, which is amazing).

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – May 13, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan are doing commentary, and they are taped from San Antonio, Texas.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, these tapings took place on April 24 and drew a sellout crowd of 10,700 fans.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – April 29, 1990

Gorilla Monsoon and Bobby Heenan call today’s action, still taped from Syracuse, New York.

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What the World Was Watching: Saturday Night’s Main Event XXVI

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura handle commentary and they are taped from Austin, Texas.  To put over the Texas setting of the show, McMahon and Ventura open the show on horseback in the aisle.  The card was hyped as “The Tussle in Texas” and took place on April 23.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew a crowd of 8,500 fans.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – April 21, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are doing commentary and they are taped from Glen Falls, New York.

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What the World Was Watching: The Wrestling Summit (Special Column)

As noted in prior columns, this show was a joint effort by the WWF, New Japan Pro Wrestling, and All Japan Pro Wrestling.  The WWF was looking to expand its global presence while New Japan and All Japan felt threatened by Akira Maeda’s shoot-like Universal Wrestling Federation, which drew a 50,000 person crowd to the Tokyo Dome for a big show in November 1989.  To counter them, New Japan and All Japan worked together on a supershow at the Tokyo Dome on February 10.  Then, they built on that effort by partnering with the WWF for another big card in Tokyo on April 13 that was named The Wrestling Summit.  According tothehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew a crowd of 53,742.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Wrestling Challenge – April 15, 1990

Vince McMahon and Bobby Heenan do commentary for this show, kicking off a new round of television tapings from Syracuse, New York.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, these tapings took place on April 3.

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What the World Was Watching: WWF Superstars – April 14, 1990

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are in the booth, and they are taped from Glen Falls, New York.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, these tapings took place on April 4.

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What the World Was Watching: WrestleMania VI

Vince McMahon and Jesse Ventura are in the booth and they are live from Toronto, Ontario, Canada in what will be Ventura’s last appearance calling a WWF pay-per-view.  According to thehistoryofwwe.com, the show drew a sellout crowd of 67,678, a new attendance record for the venue.  It drew a buyrate of 3.8 (an estimated 550,000 purchases).  This was a decline from the 5.9 buyrate of WrestleMania V, but this can be attributed to more homes getting pay-per-view access by 1990, thereby messing with the buyrate average.

Robert Goulet sings the Canadian National Anthem.  According to Bruce Prichard, Goulet was picked for this spot because he badly botched signing “The Star Spangled Banner” several years earlier and this was a chance for him to redeem himself in front of a live crowd.  The WWF put the lyrics on the Skydome’s video screen to ease Goulet’s nerves.  And if you watch his body language during the performance, he goes from a bad of nerves to a guy having the time of his life halfway through.  His wife, who watched backstage, cried her eyes out after he nailed the song.

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