DC Comics Doing Some Major Reshuffling


DC Comics is not only cancelling about 20-some titles, they're introducing a very diverse line-up of books. Black Canary, Starfire, Cyborg are three that jump out. There are a LOT of promising titles in this, honestly. The big thing they're touting is that they're going to focus more on the stories and less on continuity. Which sounds like they might finally give creative teams more breathing room. For the last few years, even before the new 52 launch, there were countless stories of how hard editors were on creative teams. So that's a good change.

Sounds like DC is trying to compete a little with Marvel's more diverse line up of comics and especially Image's diverse line of titles. Though boil it down, they're all still superhero comics, unlike Image's very diverse line. And it sounds like many of their main superhero titles, like Justice League and Superman, will still feel more like early 90s Image Comics than the DC comics I grew up on. Shame. But with this new direction, that might change, too.

​Yeah, as I mentioned before, the SUPER DUPER EVENT OVERLOAD burned me right the fuck out and I've been on an extended hiatus from comics in general since around October.  Honestly, at this point I'm happy with The Flash every Wednesday on Hulu, because it packs more nerd joy into one episode than I've gotten out of DC's comics line in many years.  GRODD GRODD GRODD GRODD GRODD!  Plus a Prison Break reunion with Captain Cold and Heatwave?  How awesome is that?  
On the Marvel side, I really really really miss Superior Spider-Man and I actually think it was a grave miscalculation to not just give Ock a new identity and let him be Venom in a new city or something.  It really sucked the fun out of the Spider comics for me when he left.  

Some Comics Discussion?

Scott, 

Looking for some comic discussion and thought the announcement of 10 of DC Comics' 40 Convergence crossovers set for April and May could be fun. The 10 2-part series that were recently announced included: 

SUPERMAN
Writer: Dan Jurgens
Artist Lee Weeks and Dan Jurgens/Norm Rapmund
Superman and Lois deal with the impending birth of their child as he is called in to protect the city.
THE ATOM
Writer: Tom Peyer
Artist: Steve Yeowell / Andy Owens
Ray Palmer finds that Ryan Choi is still alive. Together, they meet and confront Deathstroke, the man responsible for “killing” Choi, before fighting the invading Extremists.
BATGIRL
Writer: Alisa Kwitney
Artist: Rick Leonardi and Mark Pennington
After a year in the dome, Stephanie Brown is not sure she wants to be Batgirl again. But when Flashpoint Catman attacks, Red Robin and Black Bat call her back into service.
NIGHTWING/ORACLE
Writer: Gail Simone
Artist: Jan Duursema and Dan Parsons
Dick Grayson and Barbara Gordon reevaluate their relationship under the dome (wedding!), but Flashpoint Hawkman & Hawkwoman attack, and everything changes.
SPEED FORCE
Writer: Tony Bedard
Artist: Tom Grummett and Sean Parsons
Wally West and his kids are separated from Linda, which was bad enough, but when the dome falls, Flashpoint Wonder Woman comes for them.
TITANS
Writer: Fabian Nicieza
Artist: Ron Wagner and Jose Marzan
Starfire and Donna Troy come to get Roy Harper who has gone into seclusion since the death of his child and loss of his arm, but then Arsenal has to choose between his team and resurrecting his dead daughter.
JUSTICE LEAGUE
Writer: Frank Tieri
Artist: Vicente Cifuentes
When Supergirl, Zatanna, and Jade went to Jessie Quick's baby shower, they didn't expect to be taken to another planet for a year, or to be attacked by Flashpoint Aquaman.
QUESTION
Writer: Greg Rucka
Artist: Cully Hamner
Two-Face is fighting another world's Harvey Dent, and it's up to Renee Montoya as the Question to help him beat the odds.
BATMAN & ROBIN
Writer: Ron Marz
Artist: Denys Cowan and Klaus Janson
Bruce Wayne and Damian have friction with Red Hood before the Extremists attack.
HARLEY QUINN
Writer: Steve Pugh
Artist: Phil Winslade and John Dell
Harley Quinn is enjoying her normal life under the dome until Catwoman and Poison Ivy draft her to fight Captain Carrot.

Any thoughts? Have you been reading the weekly comics leading up to these events (Future's End and World's End)? They've been pretty good so far, IMO, and some of these 2-parters look like they could be pretty good. 

​Could be.  I'm getting really burned out on big events.  I haven't even started in on Axis yet over at Marvel, and the Future's End stuff holds little appeal for me.  I will buy the shit out of Speed Force, though.  I just want Wally West as Flash!  ​

 

Christopher Daniels on COMICS ON COMICS podcast


Hi Scott,


Long time fan of your work and the blog. I was wondering if I can get a plug for a podcast.

“The Fallen Angel” Christopher Daniels made an appearance on our Comics on Comics podcast here at the Sideshow Network to promote his new book with Frankie Kazarian from Aw Yeah! Comics. 


If you could promote this in your blog, it would be greatly appreciated.

Bobby Hennan, Hulk’s bod, and comics

Pretty much the best subject line ever am I right.

I've been going through a lot of Flair stuff on the Network, late 80's Steamboat, Funk, and Sting, and now back into WWF era Flair with Hennan on color. Hennan doing color on Flair matches has got to be some of the most amazing heel commentary I've ever heard. He is so intense and so real during those matches that you could almost believe that he and Flair have been friends for decades and it's the end of his world if Flair loses. Even at the end of Flair/Macho you can see Heenan in the locker room inconsolable, biting that towe.

1. Why don't we see more of that heel color commentary/bff/relationship between wrestlers/commentators/managers? I guess JBL is kind of a heel but he does that goofy laugh to often for me to care. (Something lame happens on-screen that WWE thinks is great ->"HaHA yea this is great Michael Cole!" etc etc) The King was pretty great in his day, I think, as a heel commentator. 

Also, in that era with Flair/Macho Hogan/Sid, I'm struck by how obviously different Hogan looks physique-wise in just a phew short years. He looks so short and pudgy against Sid, and fast forward to his later years in WWF and then WCW, he looks so skinny and tall. 

2. Were his physique changes during this time-frame so obviously the steroids? I remember you saying recently he needed to take time off around this time-frame due to the trial. Were people at the time that clued into steroids to even care? Or did they just not notice that he looks like a different dude?

3. Also not a question, but we're doing another 20 days of free comics if you're so inclined. comixology.tumblr.com/summerreading. Dug Forever Evil, and shockingly really am digging Superman:Doomed. Soule and Pak can write like whoa.

xoxo

​1.  I really thought JBL had the potential to go old school heel commentator for a while there, but now everything is just "LOOK AT THAT, MAGGLE COLE!" and the fake laughing and shit.  I can barely even figure out what they're going for with the commentary anymore.  The Heenan-Flair relationship is also mirrored by Jesse Ventura and Rick Rude when you're watching the old Clashes with them, as he's clearing cheering for Rude and knows his stuff inside-out.  
2.  Oh, people noticed.  Hogan going on Arsenio Hall and claiming that he only did steroids "once" was the biggest joke in the industry.
3.  I love free comics!  Not a huge fan of the new Comixology app, as I believe I've mentioned before, but that's hardly your fault.  ​

QOTD 140: Sunday Comics (and that asshole Ziggy)

This wasn’t in a newspaper

For many of us, our first like, actual interest in reading things probably came from the Sunday comics in the newspaper our parents got.

For youngin’s a newspaper is like an ebook make of paper.

Anyway, I used to devour them as a kid, waking up early on Sunday to read them and not get most of the jokes – all the while thinking the family circus was the lamest thing to ever lame.

Thus:

What are your favorite newspaper comic strips? Feel free to include internet webcomics and parodies that are good, too – like Garfield Minus Garfield and Calvin and Jobs. 






Garfield minus Garfield


This is probably one of the funniest things I’ve stumbled across on the internet, essentially the guy who makes it removes Garfield from the equation (which makes sense, since Jon can’t hear Garfield anyway), and hilarity ensues.

Zits


I like this one simply because I started reading it when I was 12, am now older than the main character in the comic by a decade. Freaky stuff.

Dilbert


I love me some Dilbert, it only gets better the more you work in a corporate setting, which is both funny and sad.

I’ll leave you with the following, which is a real thing that happened in a real comic strip that was seen by millions of people. I’m assuming Jim Davis discovered bath salts.

411mania’s “The Comics 8 Ball 3.17.14: Top 8 Comic Book Copycat Characters”

Hi Scott,

Thought this might make for some fun BoD discussion.  Call me maybe… I mean, crazy, but I'm detecting just a whiff of anti-Marvel sentiment. But only just.

http://www.411mania.com/movies/columns/316507

Eh, I feel dumber having just read that one.  Saying Hawkeye, for example, is a ripoff of Green Arrow specifically when both guys are based off the Robin Hood archetype is just ignorant.  
Anyway, speaking of comics, what the hell is going on with Hawkeye's shipping schedule right now?  It was delayed for something like four months, which killed all the momentum that it was building up, and then they shipped the Kate issue out of order.  And now there's another random issue from Christmas that just came out featuring animated dogs.  Yeah, the Pizza Dog issue was great and whimsical, but COME ON.  This story hasn't moved an inch forward in what feels like a year, with Fraction just going back and retelling the same stuff over and over.  It used to be my most-anticipated title and now I don't even know when it's coming out most times or what I'm going to get out of it.  

New Comics!

> I thought the DC books were a lot stronger this week than last week.  Court of Owls and Black Manta especially.  The Riddler one was okay and Solomon Grundy was kind of pointless.  Those are the only ones I got.  Add to that Astro City (which was great), Star Wars (which I'm enjoying) and Captain America (which is radically shifting gears but I have hopes for) and it was a pretty good week. I haven't gotten to the DC villains pile yet, but Astro City is just SUCH a great story.  Busiek is just killing it with AC.  Also want to throw some love to The Star Wars from last week, which I got on a whim and really enjoyed as a geek for early drafts and such. 

BoD Comics Presents….What If? – Triple H turned face

The recent post to the blog about Austins heel run got me
wondering…the night after Wrestlemania the fans were DYING to see HHH
turn face. My question is what if he did? That means no two man power
trip which means that the Austin/HHH vs Beniot/Jericho match never
happens, which means that Hunter doesn’t tear his quad, which means no
need to rush the invasion because you still have one of your top stars,
(maybe two although Beniot was probably headed for neck surgery either
way.) And instead of the invasion you have Hunter and Austin batting all
summer which means that when Hogan and Flair were brought in the
company is in an entirely different place. Call me a Triple H mark if
you must but I really wish he had hit Stone Cold with the sledgehammer
that night

Honestly, I think it would have created a few more interesting match-ups, but I think the InVasion would have happened as it did, with Triple H leading the WWE side of things. Plus, Hogan & Flair would have probably been brought in the same way, as they both came at a time when Triple H was back.

DC Comics Action Figures

———- Forwarded message ———-

Hey Scott, I know there's a ton of other comics fans on your blog. Every year, Mattel does a subscription service for DC figures – one figure a month, with the first three for 2014 scheduled to be 90s harpoon-hand Aquaman, Superboy Conner Kent, and Ice, with a Doomsday subscription-exclusive figure. Since the sub needs a certain number of subscribers to go through each year and is only available on the barely-advertised MattyCollector.com site, I was wondering if you could let everyone who reads your blog know about it. Subscription period ends August 19th.

More information is available in this flyer: http://24.media.tumblr.com/9dc8667d4b9bbeead41944ded2156208/tumblr_mqiyy89IBl1rh91t7o1_1280.jpg

Thanks!

Joel

Fantasy Booking…but with comics

Quick questions: 
 
You are given the pen at DC or Marvel.  You can write any single book for a year (12 issues) and you don't have to fit things in with a giant crossover.
 
Who would your write?
 
What would you do with them?

Are we talking currently established titles, or just whatever I want to do?  Because my dream book would be JLI-era Booster Gold & Blue Beetle, just hanging around the DC universe and having wacky adventures ala Hawkeye right now.  
Second choice:  I would take Superman and carry on with the Grant Morrison Action Comics thing of the t-shirt and jeans version of the character going after crooked stockbrokers and stuff.  Those first few issues were top notch stuff and so fun.  Alternate idea:  Do a throwback with barrel-chested Mort Weisinger Superman with coked-out continuity and crazy Silver Age plotlines and stuff.  

Lightning Round: Comics Edition

I give the super-hero, you give me the first (and/or second) definitive Story-arc


Legion of Super-Heroes:

Great Darkness Saga, obviously.  

Hal Jordan:

I'm gonna say Hard Travelling Heroes because Neal Adams signed my copy of the TPB.  

Avengers:

Didn't read any Marvel growing up, so I couldn't say.  
X-Men:

Age of Apocalypse really summed up the 90s in a lot of ways, with "Alpha" and "Omega" issues, foil covers, temporary renumbering, and a fake death undone months later.  

Flash:

The Return of Barry Allen.  Turned Wally West into a main eventer for good.  Too bad they now hate him for some reason. 

Spider-Man:

For better or worse, the Clone Saga.  

JLA:

Tower of Babel.  

Hulk:

Never read Hulk until very recently.  I really liked the last run of the title, though, with Hulk and Banner trying to outsmart each other with a series of seemingly impossible deathtraps.  

Captain America:

I've been reading the Steve Englehart stuff from the 70s with the Falcon via the Essential collections and really enjoying it, but I don't know that much of it is "definitive" because I was never a Marvel guy.  

Batman:

Bare chested Batman fighting Ra's Al Ghul in the desert with awesome Neal Adams artwork.  You can also say Tower of Babel here.
Teen Titans:

The Judas Contract.  I still re-read that TPB all the time.  

Thor:

No idea, never read anything from the character, although I really loved the movie.  

Fill in any you like.

Comics – Where to begin?

Scott –


The flux of Marvel and DC movies has created interest in comics everywhere.  I've never read a comic in my life, but the movies have intrigued me enough to where I quickly rush home to Wikipedia to get more information on these characters/worlds/villians, trying to find easter eggs in the movies, etc.  As you would imagine, Wikipedia isn't always the most consistent source.


My question is…as a potential first timer reading comics…where in the world do I start?  With so many deaths and restarts happening all the time in every franchise, I would love an opinion from you and/or your bloggers on where someone with no real history with any characters (besides movies) can get an accurrate start.  Thanks.


Phew, that's a toughie.  Usually comics are something where you start reading as a kid and form your attachments based on those early memories of it.  The whole problem for newer readers to comics in general is that sequential art is not something that necessarily lends itself well to easy figuring.  It's not like a standard book where you just read the words left to right, there's a lot of figuring out if things are moving up and down or side-to-side depending on how the page is laid out and such.  The second problem is that the comics industry is such an insular group to begin with — I'm a pretty hardcore comics guy and even I don't like hanging out in comic shops.  That's why I buy everything digitally now.  Which might actually work well for you, because if you check out comixology.com there's a wide variety of free comics you can check out to sample stuff.  The thing is, you never know what you like until you read some stuff and figure out what you like.  If you're just interested in the standard capes and tights stuff, DC and Marvel are generally your best bets, and they're falling all over themselves to welcome new readers at this point.  DC in particular just did a whole month of "#0" issues a year after rebooting the entire universe (don't ask), and any of them are a good starting point for that particular title. Marvel is also doing a similar deal with Marvel Now, although on a much smaller scale.  Most of Marvel's books have an incredibly handy "Previously on Lost…" type of recap at the beginning that makes it easy to jump in, regardless.   

Generally speaking, the safest bet is Watchmen.  Everyone's got a copy, whether comics nerds or not, and it's basically one of the greatest comics stories ever done.  You can find it at any bookstore for a reasonable price, too.  If you're wanting to sample a normal monthly title, try Batman.  You'll already know the characters from the movies, it's a great book and very new reader friendly, and everyone loves Batman anyway.  Superman frankly sucks right now so unless you want to delve into the classic stuff, I'd avoid him.  There's also Justice League, which has the big seven heroes that everyone knows and is the biggest selling comic on the market right now.  On the Marvel side, everyone is connected to either the Avengers or X-Men at this point, and Uncanny Avengers (combining the two teams!) just launched, plus it's got Captain America, Thor, and Wolverine and everyone knows who they are.  
Hope that helps as a start.

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

The Comics Thread

Light week, so I finally got around to catching up with stuff from the past few weeks and then promptly forgot about them.  This writing gig can be tough when you’ve got a short attention span.  Mainly I want to talk about how much I’m loving Amazing Spider-Man since picking it up with the goofy time travel two-parter.  The Point One issue a couple of weeks ago was probably the best one I’ve read yet, as it actually explained the new status quo for Spidey in a way where I felt like I, as a new reader, was being welcomed into the comic without years of backstory needed.  Plus Spider-Man scoring off Michael Morbius by comparing him to Edward was fantastic.  It really shows that you don’t need to put a new character into the suit in order to breathe new life into it, you just need a writer who gets him and get what works about him.  Then issue 680, with Spider-Man and Human Torch IN SPACE, was great too, especially the bickering over SPOILERS and Johnny lamenting all the TV he missed while dead.  I love light-hearted Spidey, so this and Avenging are a great combination for me.  Justice League #6 was kind of a tiresome end to the initial arc, as we’re finally to the end of the “Five Years Earlier” formation, and it really didn’t feel like it earned the big finish.  Like I’m sure Geoff Johns and Jim Lee will craft some wonderful big-selling stories when they get to the present time, but there wasn’t anything here that couldn’t have been summed up in a one-page secret origin deal instead.  Plus the ending with the world suddenly accepting “super heroes” felt like they were muddling their muddled continuity even further.  But I liked it well enough, Jim Lee’s army of inkers aside.  That’s all I got this week, except to add go out and buy Atomic Robo now that it’s completed. 

Notable Comics This Week

Once again, just more of a free-from thoughts on stuff I’ve read recently rather than an actual column of reviews. – I am now caught up with Irredeemable and I’m kinda on the edge of my seat wondering what’s going to happen in the final few issues.  The Plutonian is a REALLY complex character and it’s been a hell of a ride thus far, even if the middle portion on the prison planet kind of felt like a big time-filler.  The twists and turns in this series have been so astonishingly great that I really hope that Waid can wrap it up in style, hopefully without resorting to something like Qubit going back in time and erasing Tony’s birth or something like that.  I’d rather not have any time travel cheats to end things. – Batwoman was still good minus JH Williams on art, but now it feels a lot more cartoony and comic-booky and it kind of slipped a level.  I liked all the stuff going on, but the artwork really used to elevate even a mediocre story and now it’s kind of out there to sink or swim on its own.  – Animal Man and Swamp Thing remain the best one-two punch of the week right now.  I just loved the “Tights” mini-movie because it felt like such a different way to tell a story, although Travel Foreman will be missed on art.  And Swamp Thing is just killing it, as you can feel Alec’s desperation to become Swamp Thing at the end again and frustration when it doesn’t work out that way.  – Action Comics #6 was a major step down.  Grant Morrison varies wildly between fun storytelling (All-Star Superman) and impenetrable claptrap (Final Crisis) and this was veering dangerously close to the latter because I have fucking clue what was supposed to be happening in this comic.  We’ve got the origin story, armored Superman, adult Legion, flashbacks, Kryptonite people…everything just jammed into one book and by the time Superman was crawling for the rocket I was totally lost trying to figure out what he was supposed to accomplish.  I’m hoping it gets back to Golden Age Superman again soon, but I’ve heard that ends after #7 anyway and it’s all uptight Jim Lee Superman from then on.  – I should also point out that I’ve read Batman #5 several times now, and I never do that.  It just keeps drawing me back in even weeks later.  – Scarlet Spider continues to impress.  As does Hulk.  Deadpool #50 was much more fun and enjoyable than the terrible Musical Issue, although I don’t read X-Force so I felt like I was missing something there.  That’s all I got this time out!