What the World Was Watching: Clash of the Champions XXX

Tony Schiavone and Bobby Heenan are doing commentary and they are live from Las Vegas, Nevada.

Opening Contest for the WCW Television Championship:  Arn Anderson (Champion w/Colonel Robert Parker & Meng) (1-0) defeats Johnny B. Badd (4-1) after a DDT at 7:37:

Badd must not have a “rematch clause” because he needed the fans to call the WCW hotline to give him a return match against Anderson, who defeated him for the title several weeks ago.  Schavione spends a lot of the match putting over WCW in 1994, noting that the August edition of Clash of the Champions the previous year was the only wrestling program to break the top 100 programs on cable television.  Badd blasts Anderson with the Tutti Frutti, but Parker uses some water at ringside to revive his man and when Badd chases Parker around the ring and into the squared circle, a revived Anderson catches him with his finisher to retain the title.  This was a solid opener.  Rating:  **½

Gene Okerlund interviews Kevin Sullivan and the Butcher, with Sullivan saying that he and the Butcher are prepared for what lies ahead and that Big Van Vader, Harley Race, and Ric Flair being there will work in their favor.  Sullivan also implies that Randy Savage might turn on Hulk Hogan in the main event.

A really bad music video of Alex Wright airs where we get clips of his matches through multiple television monitors.

Alex Wright (7-0) pins Bobby Eaton (2-3) after a reverse flying body press at 7:29:

Schiavone lets fans know before the match that Arn Anderson has been booked to defend the Television Championship against Randy Savage on Saturday Night.  This is billed as a contest of high flyers, but Eaton’s offense is largely mat based, solely going to the air for the Alabama Jam.  As the records of the participants indicate, this match’s purpose is to put over Wright through the midcard and while it does that, Eaton’s streak of poor matches in 1995 continues due to his methodical work.  Both men kick out of each other’s finishers before Wright goes back to his finisher off of an Irish whip into the corner to remain undefeated.  Rating:  **

Okerlund recaps the issues surrounding the Hulk Hogan-Vader match for SuperBrawl before welcoming Vader out for an interview.  That sort of defeats the purpose of Vader having to buy tickets to attend the show when he can just wander the backstage area at will.  Vader accuses Hogan of dodging him, saying that his time is running out.  Harley Race is not with Vader because before the show he was in an automobile accident that permanently ended his career as a manager.

Ric Flair comes to the ringside area with two women.  He makes peace with Vader and takes a seat in the crowd.  Heenan makes sure to welcome Flair back to WCW.

WCW Tag Team Championship Match:  Harlem Heat (Champions w/Sister Sherri) (4-0) beat Stars & Stripes (4-1) when Booker T pins Marcus Bagwell after Stevie Ray kicks Bagwell in the face at 9:22:

This is the second match on the show where the prior champions are getting a rematch.  Once again, the Patriot ignores the referee’s instructions not to be in the ring on a false tag and that produces a lot of chaos.  Booker T and Marcus Bagwell miss their cue to run into Sherri on the ring apron so they have to redo the spot, with Bagwell having Booker T rolled up before Stevie Ray kicks him in the face to reverse the fall and help the tag champions retain.  Rating:  **

Okerlund interviews Hulk Hogan, Randy Savage, and Jimmy Hart.  Hogan tasks Hart with being the lookout with Vader and Ric Flair at ringside.

Okerlund hypes SuperBrawl V that will take place in Baltimore, Maryland.  The only match signed so far is Hogan against Vader for the WCW Championship.  This pre-recorded segment should have gone earlier in the show because Okerlund talks about Vader possibly showing up at ringside for the Clash when Vader has already done so.

Call 1-900-909-9900 to hear what is happening behind the scenes at the Clash!

Grudge Match with the Guardian Angel as Special Guest Referee:  Sting (3-0) defeats Avalanche (0-1) via submission to the Scorpion Deathlock at 5:20:

The Angel establishes early on that he aims to be fair, forcing Avalanche to give Sting a break in the corner and keeping Sting from assaulting Avalanche on the arena floor a short time later.  Sting overcomes an assault from the gravitationally challenged Avalanche, spams the Stinger’s Splash, and slams Avalanche before locking in the Scorpion Deathlock.  Avalanche is shown submitting, but the Angel refuses to call for the bell, causing referee Nick Patrick to run in and end the contest.  This will hopefully end the series of Sting-Avalanche matches as Sting dominated much of the contest.  Rating:  *

After the bell, Sting and the Angel fight each other, with the Angel getting the upper hand and pummeling Sting with a belt until Stars & Stripes and Alex Wright make the save.  Okerlund interviews the Angel, who says Avalanche never submitted.  The Angel tears his shirt, cursing as he does so – thereby receiving a reprimand from Okerlund – and says he is going back to his roots as Big Bubba Rogers.  This was a much needed turn for the Angel, who was treading water and getting very little accomplished with his existing gimmick.

Hulk Hogan & Randy Savage (w/Jimmy Hart) defeat Kevin Sullivan & the Butcher (1-0) when Hogan pins the Butcher after a leg drop at 12:07:

Michael Buffer does the ring introductions to lend this lopsided bout some credibility.  What this match is famous for is the “reviving elbow” where Savage hits Hogan with his flying elbow smash to awaken him after a Butcher sleeper hold.  The crowd thought that was a heel turn at first, though.  As expected, Savage gets put in peril after taking a back drop over the top rope and Hogan cleans up with the usual after the hot tag.  This was a paint by the numbers main event from the Hogan era.  Rating:  **

After the bell, Vader knocks Savage out of the ring and confronts Hogan.  The crowd is evenly divided in their support of each man as Vader does not sell Hogan’s punches and Hogan responds by not selling the powerbomb, thereby killing elements of this feud right out of the gate.  Hogan and Savage then team up to knock Vader down and he flees to end the show.

The Last Word:  The opener was the best part of the event and although nothing stood out as an all-time classic, nothing was downright terrible either outside of the booking of the Hogan-Vader confrontation.  It helped that matches had relatively clean finishes, avoiding the disqualification fests that have bedeviled WCW programming so far in 1995.  One would hope that Hogan would be done with the Faces of Fear for good after this but they would re-emerge later as the Dungeon of Doom.

Attendance:  3,500 (2,300 paid)

Rating:  3.50 (-.10 over previous edition)

Up Next:  WCW Pro for January 28!