RF Video Shoot Interview with “Doctor D” David Shultz

This was filmed in October 2006

The interview was conducted by Rob Feinstein and Doug Gentry

It runs for two hours long

 

 

Shultz is first asked if he was a fan of wrestling as a kid. He said he first saw wrestling at age 20 and that he grew up in a poor area of Tennessee where he had to fight for everything he had.

 

He talks about asking Herb Welch to get trained as he talks about back then guys would talk you out of training as they were very secretive of the business. He then paid $300 and began to train and he got stretched out so bad that his wife had to help him out of the car. Anyway, Shultz said that some of the guys Nick Gulas was training would come by and shoot on him but he destroyed them all as Shutlz then said that Welch told him to lighten up and that he’d never draw a dime in wrestling because if people thought you were that tough, they’d never believe you could be beat and not pay to see you wrestle. Shultz then talks about how valuable that advice was then puts over Welch for fighting guys on oil rigs and at carnivals when he was younger as he was as tough as it gets.

 

He was working in Missouri for some small, redneck promotion as he put it to make $25 while it cost him about $40 to get their and back. Shultz said that the fans would throw knives, rocks, and scissors at him but said the experience was valuable as you could prepare yourself for any situation after dealing with that.

 

Shultz worked in Memphis for the Jarretts. He said Bill Dundee was okay but that Jerry Lawler was a wimp. He talks about riding with Lawler and how fans would try to hurt them. Shultz said that he once took a guy down who had a gun but Lawler would never attack anybody when threatened. He does call Lawler a great worker who had the “pencil” and that he would not let another babyface get over on him. Shultz also said that Dutch Mantell was a “yes man” and that Randy Savage was a tough kid who had problems with some people but he got along with personally. Shultz talks about how Savage would challenge people like George Gulas, who Shultz jokes his wife could beat up.

 

He left Memphis as he felt held back by Lawler and wanting to make more money. Shultz ended up working for the Fullers in Southeast Championship Wrestling because he had a good reputation there due to Herb Welch. Shultz said that Robert Fuller owed him $40 once and did not want to pay him so while in Florida, he roughed him up a bit until he got paid.

 

Shultz then talks about seeing Hulk Hogan in the promotion and how he was all jacked up on steroids and living in the back of his van. Shultz then invited Hogan to live with him and they became close but Hogan was scared because he knew he’d get his ass kicked.

 

He talks about some other workers. He thought Bob Armstrong was great but that Austin Idol was one of the worst workers who did not have any psychology. When asked, he said that Billy Robinson was a bully and one night he told Robinson in the locker room if he ever tried to shoot on him it would be the last time he ever hurt someone and they never had any problems.

 

Shultz went to Calgary and worked for Stu Hart, calling him a great, honest man. He talks about breaking Bruce Hart’s leg once and said that Stu didnt seem to be mad, even saying that he might have needed that to happen. He talks about going to the Dungeon and not letting Stu put any holds on him, knowing he’d get stretched and you would probably scream.

 

He talks about the British Bulldogs and all of the steroids they used and how that took a toll on them, saying that Davey Boy Smith weighed 165 lbs when he first started out.  Shultz also denies there were any problems with him then noted how you would never leave your drink in the locker room with him around as you’d never know what he’d put into the cup.

 

Shultz went to the AWA after Calgary as Hogan recommended him to Verne Gagne as they needed a heel. Shultz did not like Greg Gagne and thought he was like George Gulas, noting they should have teamed together. He then tells a story of when he told Verne he was quitting to join the WWF. Verne threatened to throw him out of the TV station as Shultz reminded him he was an old man and not to bite off more than he can chew then Greg got up and said he’ll throw him out as Shultz told Verne someone needs to hold back his son.

 

In the AWA, he liked teaming with Mr. Saito and puts him over for being tough and being a nice guy. He said Gene Okerlund jumped on the Hogan bandwagon and drove that right to the bank. Shultz said that Bobby Heenan was a snitch for Verne Gagne then later on for Vince McMahon in the WWF as he talks about how he got a lot of guys in trouble. Shultz then said that Nick Bockwinkle was “ok” and that Crusher Jerry Blackwell was a nice guy. He said Mad Dog Vachon was clumsy and you had to work your ass off against him. Shultz also said that Brad Rheingans was super nice and tough.

 

When asked if the AWA could have gone National at this point (1983), Shultz said yes but that Verne was scared to do so.

 

On working in New Japan, Shultz said he did a total of five tours and enjoyed the experience and said he was paid well. He talks about Antonio Inoki wanted to beat him on TV but that he did not sign Shultz’s contract so Shultz said he refused and they had a rough match and that was his last time working in the company.

 

Shultz is asked about Hogan and talks about how he cannot wrestle and would always blow up in his matches because he only lifted and took steroids and never did any cardio.

 

He went to the WWF and thought Vince McMahon Sr. was a great guy but that Vince Jr. was a liar who uses people up for his own benefit then gets rid of them. Shultz said Vince Jr. told him he’d make millions of dollars over the next five years and would always have a home.

 

Shultz talks about Roddy Piper and said that he was known to stab people in the back. He never thought he was much of a worker but admits he is a tough person to impress.

 

He teamed with Paul Orndorff against Rocky Johnson & Tony Atlas. Shultz puts Orndorff and Johnson over as workers but that Atlas needed to be carried. When asked about how their interview against Johnson & Atlas were practically racist, Shultz said that they wanted you to play up stuff like that to get heat and how Johnson went along with it while Atlas got upset.

 

When asked, Shultz said there was jealousy from the veterans when he was with Piper and Orndorff, saying that Mr. Fuji was another one who talked behind their backs.

 

On his bloodbath  match against Hogan at Met Centre in Minnesota, Shultz said they were both covered in blood and brawling everywhere, apparently making people in the crowd sick as a result.

 

He talks about his segment with his family on “Tuesday Night Titans.” Shultz said that they got actors to portray his kids and wife as Vince wanted him to look like the ultimate bad guy. Shultz said that the kids cried after the first take and he would have to remind them that it was all for the show and he was not really mad at them. Shultz then said people called the child welfare department on him after the segment and how he got a ton of hate mail when the segment ended as Shultz like that because it got him more heat and that made him more money.

 

On the rumor of Shultz coming up with the “WrestleMania” name, Shultz said he did and Hogan probably went behind his back to Vince but does not care as he did not think he would credit for it anyway.

 

Now, he is asked about the incident in which he slapped ABC News reporter John Stossel, which aired on a segment for the show “20/20.” He talks about how Vince called him to the side and let him know that Stossel was going to do the piece and shit on the business and wanted Shultz to stay in character and “blast” Stossel. So, they do the interview and its stops and starts frequently as Shultz said it was pretty standard then asked Stossel if that was all he had to say. Stossel then asked him if things were fake but Shultz said he heard it as “I think you are fake” and he slapped him as a result. Shultz claimed he never hit Stossel in the ear but on the face as Stossel took off. After that, he wrestled his match against Antonio Inoki then was told afterwards by Vince to get his stuff and run back to the hotel as he was in trouble. Later that night, Vince called him up to say he did a great job and asked if he was okay. However, shortly after that, Vince said they were going to send him to Japan for 6-8 months then after that he’d come back to work a program against Hogan. He got to Japan then they started to have him beat up a reporter there to as part of a work. He then got a disposition for the Stossel case when he sued Vince and was asked if all he did was beat up reporters and they showed the footage of the Japanese reporter as Shultz said Vince set him up then at the trial, Shultz claimed Vince told him to say he was behind everything. Shultz then said in Vince’s disposition, he told Stossel not to speak with wrestlers while Stossel’s claimed that Vince directed him to Shultz. He said that both of there dispositions were completely different and that meant someone was lying. Shultz even offered to go back on 20/20 but it had to be live as to not edit things to look a certain way. When asked who he thought was lying, Shultz said both of them were.

 

On the rest of the 20/2o piece, Shultz said that Eddy Mansfeld was rightfully blackballed from wrestling for exposing the business. He also said that Mansfeld wanted to be a big shot and never could do it in wrestling.

 

He is asked about Jerry Lawler being involved with underage girls, Shultz said that Lawler is pathetic and that he would not be living today if that was his daughter.

 

Back to the Stossel incident, Shultz said that the locker room congratulated him for slapping Stossel. He later said he has nothing against Stossel personally and just did what he was told but did get upset when Stossel called wrestling fake.

 

On his incident with Mr. T, Shultz said he challenged him to a fight in Los Angeles while he was wrestling and Mr. T was in attendance. Shultz said he was saying all sorts of things to Mr. T, who he said was afraid.

 

Shultz said he was making more money working Independent shows and overseas after getting fired from the WWF than he would have if he went back to the AWA.

 

After wrestling, he became a bounty hunter. He bought a house in Connecticut while working in the WWF and did not want to move again as he wanted her to finish high school. He was given $4,000 to collect a bounty on some guy local law enforcement were afraid of as Shultz claimed he went to the guy’s house and stuck a gun in his mouth and got him in quickly.

 

He tells another bounty hunter story. Shultz talked about how he was doing a few talk shows being that he was a pro wrestler turned bounty hunter and how he was chasing a guy for six weeks. He was supposed to be on “Regis and Kathy Lee” but did not want to lose the guy he had been chasing through 4-5 different states. An informant told him the guy was staying at the Days Inn in Atlanta and Shultz came to the guy’s room with the local police. They knocked and the guy showed the police identification that said he was someone else so they could not do anything about the situation. Shultz asked the police if they were done and they said yes so he dragged the guy out in the hallway by his threads and they searched his room and sure enough, they found his real ID stating he was the guy.

 

When asked about the most dangerous thing he had seen while bounty hunting, Shultz talked about finding guys for the FBI, DEA, and ATF but he was not interested unless there was a bond on the fugitives because he would not make any money if he did as he talks about not getting paid by the FBI. Shultz said he has been shot at a few times but never put himself in a dangerous situation as he’d wait for them getting into the cars, going to a restaurant or in their sleep. He even talks about rigging their cars with Cayenne pepper so when they started it up, the pepper would go everywhere and they could not breathe and have to leave the car and Shultz would get them that way.

 

He talks about how you have to be incredibly naive to believe steroids are not a part of wrestling today. Shultz is asked about drugs when he was wrestling and said he took codeine for injuries that a doctor was prescribed and would take that or something else prescribed like Valium so you could sleep on the pain but never abused anything he was prescribed or did any street drugs.

 

Shultz does not miss the wrestling business as the people and fans are rude and that the intelligence level of the average fan has to be low to still watch today. He does not have any regrets for anything that took place during his career.

 

On the toughest guy in the business, Shultz said there is no one he would be afraid to fight. He heard the stories of Haku but never saw that side of him and that he was a nice guy. He then states he is not saying he can kick Haku’s ass but once again clarifying that he is simply not afraid of anyone.

 

He no longer watches wrestling today and said he turned it on once to see someone kiss Vince’s ass and thought it was pathetic and the lowest you can get.

 

Shultz does not keep in contact with anyone in the wrestling business today.

 

His favorite moment in his career was when he slapped Stossel, even though he hates saying that, because it ended up getting him notoriety after it happened.

 

On growing up, Shultz said he was not racist and lived next to black families and they would take care of him when his mother went away. He then talks about being against those unwilling to pull their own weight and want to live off of everyone else and that people of all races do that then goes into how he does not think that interracial or gay marriage is right but that does not mean that it is wrong and if they want to do that, more power to them. Okay then.

 

Shultz then talks about George W. Bush and thinks he is probably doing the best job he is capable of and people should walk in his shoes before casting judgement.

 

The biggest misconception about himself, Shultz said, is that he is a bad guy. Shultz then talks about being in New York for this interview and how everyone is angry and no one wants to help anyone out.

 

We are then shown unedited footage from the 20/20 piece. It lasts about a minute and we see Shultz completely in character as he dresses down Stossel and slaps him a few times. Shultz said he showed this as he wants you to see what actually happened as his attorneys gave him this tape to own.

 

 

Final Thoughts: Honestly, Shultz seemed to be trying way too hard here to stay in his wrestling character. At least that is how I took this interview. The constant mentions of kicking people’s asses came off as someone trying to hard to sound tough. Then again, some of the comments he made at the end of the interview made it seem like his character is a lot like himself so who knows what is being exaggerated and what is true.

I actually thought his bounty hunting stories were the best part of the interview, besides his take on the Stossel incident. Shultz did not appear to be much of gossiper and that is fine.

Overall, the interview is entertaining but depending on how much you can take of Shultz constantly reminding you how tough he is will be the deciding factor. I can see a lot of people getting sick of listening to this due to that.

 

You can purchase the DVD for $20 here or download a digital copy for $9.99 here

 

Follow me on Twitter if you like

 

Here is my schedule for the next several days:

 

Friday: WWF Superstars of Wrestling 7/9/88

Saturday: RoH Main Event Spectacles 11/1/03

Sunday: WWF Wrestling Challenge 7/10/88

Monday: WWF Los Angeles Sports Arena 7/15/88

Tuesday: WWF Superstars of Wrestling 7/16/88

Wednesday: PWG All-Star Weekend XII, Night One 3/4/16

Thursday: Shoot Interview TBD