Vince Thoughts

It’s been obvious for a while now (to me at least) that the blame for all of the negative things about WWE currently falls on Vince’s shoulders. It’s been said for years now that he refuses to let any one man be bigger than the brand, thus the wrestlers are practically neutered at the door. His process sucks but I understand the intention behind it. This is isn’t changing anytime soon so I’m curious why people are still complaining and groaning about it. I know the future looks bright for Vince’s inevitable departure in Triple H but NXT aside, him going over Sting left me highly doubtful about how much will actually change. These people have made the wrestling business their entire world and I don’t think it’s possible for any of them to ever be objective about it. What are your thoughts on that?

Late night post-Payback post!  I think the events of Payback, where stuff happened and, you know, that thing in the main event occurred with Kane and everything, will sum up everything you need to know about the product. 

Vince Russo’s take on Raw rating


Hey Scott, check this out:

http://www.wrestlinginc.com/wi/news/2015/0506/594041/vince-russo-says-sami-zayn-is-not-a-star/

Oh, golly, Vince Russo says something mean to the internet that he himself is a part of.  How controversial.  His theory would mean something if:

a)  The damn show wasn't three hours long,

​b)  Sami Zayn was in any way advertised beforehand.
Also, Vince Russo trying to tell anyone who has "star power" given the guys he's pushed as major stars is ridiculous.  I've wasted enough on this already.  

Stuck in a limo with Vince

Hey Scott,


I think your readers would enjoy this interview I conducted with former WWE Magazine editor Brian Solomon to promote his new book, PRO WRESTLING FAQ.

Solomon shared some funny stories about being stuck in a limo with Vince McMahon and wearing Freddie Blassie's slippers. He also discussed working for Shane McMahon, why Smackdown Magazine failed, and the problem with getting advertising on RAW.


Thanks!

OK, but if my readers DON'T enjoy it, I know where you live.  

Vince the Magnanimous

Hey Scott,

 
Love the '96 stuff on the blog.
 
Two (related) questions from that era –
 
1) Why did Vince sign Pillman to a big guaranteed contract after the accident left him basically unable to work and a shell of himself? He was pretty clearly damaged, had a fused ankle, and could barely work a match, so what was Vince expecting to get out of him? Was he just being nice and cutting the near crippled guy a break?
 
2) Why was Vince (sort of) bankrolling ECW? What was in it for him? This is a guy who put numerous territories out of business and raided their talent…here, he barely stole anyone from ECW, except Foley, and he's bankrolling the competition. So what gives?
 
Is Vince a nicer guy than we give him credit for? 

Well, in the case of Pillman, Brian was basically misrepresenting the severity of the injury to everyone in an effort to secure a deal.  At the time it was thought that he'd be out a few months and then return, which was actually a major sticking point in the WCW negotiations.  Bischoff wanted a provision that allowed WCW to terminate him with 90 days notice just in case he was, say, unable to wrestle ever again due to reckless driving.  McMahon offered a guaranteed contract, and so Pillman took that one.  Plus even if Pillman was injured, it was still a major coup to get someone perceived as being hot like Pillman was.  
As for ECW, although he was never actively bankrolling them, I think both he and Bischoff understood that it was better to have ECW around to develop talent for them.  Heyman, on his DVD, would like to stress that Vince never gave him money, however.  He was given $1000 a week to compensate the company for the loss of a music licensing deal that 2 Cold Scorpio had.  And would Paul lie?  

Vince and the Hall of Fame

Hello!

Have been going back and watching all of the old HOF ceremonies on the Network. Once thing I noticed is that during the early modern ceremonies ('04 on), almost every inductee takes the time to thank Vince and the McMahon family.

Then, after the first year or two, no one even mentions Vince, let alone thanks him in their speeches. It's actually somewhat distracting after a while. We've heard guys like Shawn Michaels reference this in their HOF appearances, but what gives? Why does Vince get the Vol

​d​

emort treatment at his own HOF?

​Probably just a weird Vince-ism, and the same reasoning as why he doesn't want to be inducted into his own Hall of Fame.  ​

Zanatopic: The Vince Is Dead Universe

It seems that my attempt to make a Friday column dedicated to the most spectacular injuries in wrestling didn’t take off like I hoped, so here’s another try.

Let’s take one aspect of the past, change it, and attempt to extrapolate what the future might have looked like in this alternate universe.  The bookworm term for this is “counterfactual”.  One insane person has spent an entire lifetime rebooking WWE history from the perspective of Vince McMahon having a hard on for Ricky Steamboat instead of Hulk Hogan:

http://whatifwrestling.blogspot.com

Let’s not be that insane, but let’s see if this is something that we could have fun with.

Zanatopic 1 (out of a likely total of 1): Imagine that somebody takes Daniel Bryan’s time machine, goes back to 1981, and assassinates Vince McMahon Jr.  What happens to the wrestling industry?

Vince McMahon Sr. was against national expansion from the start, and was not long for this world anyway.  Linda probably would have wanted nothing to do with running the World Wrestling Federation, and an 11 year old Shane McMahon wouldn’t be able to do so either.  So the industry would go on to be directed by other forces.

Does some other organization that gains national exposure through cable, such as Jim Crockett Promotions, World Class Championship Wrestling, or the American Wrestling Alliance, make a play to become the dominant force of wrestling?  Does Paul Heyman or Eric Bischoff come along in the 90’s to take over in a Vinceless world?  Does the territorial system live on to this day?  Does it morph with MMA to become some type of hybrid?

Or, as I believe, does professional wrestling just fade into obscurity like roller derby?

What say you, Blog of Doom?

Ted Turner and Vince question

In viewing the history of wrestling…oops a, I mean sports entertainment, Vince likes to paint a negative portrait of Ted Turner's dealings during wcw's existence, including the period when WWF was aired on TBS following the GWC purchase.

Vince's seeming negative opinion of Ted has got me thinking. Do you think part of Vince's willingness to rip apart WCW (and Ted by proxy) is due to personal jealousy?

Like Vince, Ted can be considered an even most successful businessman than his father as he took over a family businessman and turned it into a multimedia empire, but unlike Vince, his success has not just occurred in a single field, while Vince works hard to downplay his failures in other mediums (WBL, XFL, WWE Films, the Network).

Ted Turner has his name or involvement in several cable stations including TNT, TBS, TCM, and CNN, where as Vince has murky relationships with television stations which have only gotten worse (for wwe) in the last decade.

Ted has a successful (and tasty) chain of restaurants in Ted's Montana Grill, while Vince could barely keep wwf New York (later The World) running.

Ted owns the Atlanta Braves, and later early left it to be run by professionals (albeit after some major mistakes on his part), while Vince's XFL experiment is still a punchline over a decade after it blinked in and out of existence.

Ted owns a significant amount of film history produced by MGM (pre 1986) while WWE films strives to make a film that does well outside of direct to DVD.

Ted has a good association with the United Nations, while Vince's wife failed to win a senate race.

Ted seems to be the opposite of Vince as while WCW did go under, he's achieved success far beyond it, and he was fairly successful before then too, while Vince is unable to be successful in any field but wrestling

Does Vince see in Ted Turner the man he wishes he could be and hates him for it?

I would say that there's very little question that Vince has been harboring an inferiority complex towards Billionaire Ted since the Georgia debacle in 84.  The fact that Vince always painted himself in competition with Turner, even at the points when Ted was little more than a source of money for WCW who wasn't any more involved than green-lighting decisions, shows how jealous Vince really was.  

Vince Russo AMA on reddit 10am this Thursday


​"Bro, I have no idea.  Swear to god, bro."
"Bro, I had nothing to do with that.  It was all the guys who were before me, bro."
"​Bro, I'm 100% with you on that one, but creative control and Standards and Practices tied my hands, bro."
Just a guess.  

Vince McMahon and Triple H at Odds Over Who Will be Brock Lesnar’s WrestleMania Opponent?

According to Dave Meltzer of F4WOnline.com, Vince and HHH have been “butting heads” when deciding who should be Lesnar’s opponent at WrestleMania. HHH reportedly wants Lesnar to face Roman Reigns while Vince wants him to face The Rock. Some people backstage have even reported that Vince tends to undercut HHH while others believe it is a case of the two playing “good cop/bad cop” as there are no hard feelings between the two.

QOTD #24: Vince McMahon

Today’s Question:
What’s the first Vince
McMahon moment to pop into your head?
Seeing as how Vince might be the greatest character in the
history of the wrestling business, I suspect we’ll have a lot of fun with this
one. Start the conversation now by clicking on “Comments” or scrolling to the
end. Otherwise, stick around for yesterday’s discussion.

Yesterday our discussion was about the best match you
recently saw for the first time. We’re all fans who seek out content, and
you’ll never cease to be amazed by what treasures might have been missed. I was
giddy watching the match between the Japanese wrestler and the blow-up doll
that you shared with me a couple of days ago; that thing was a masterpiece.
Let’s check out your responses.
Will1225: Paul London vs. Billy Kidman from No Mercy
2004. One of the last storylines the Crusierweight wrestlers had in wwe without
it involving the cruiserweight title.
The Shooting Star Press of DEATH match. After their
fantastic tag-team run together, they really meshed well as Former Partners Who
Hate Each Other. This rarely actually works out.
VintageECW: Hogan v Funk from SNME was great! Hogan
could really move in 85-86.
A shocking pick from someone with “ECW” in their name, but a
great one nevertheless. I’ve heard reports of some legendary matches in Japan
that I’ve never seen. Hogan wasn’t really a stiff until the 90’s, and his WWWF
& AWA work prove it.
dirtyearsbill: Balls Mahoney vs Masato Tanaka from Hardcore
Heaven 2000. Put on this show not expecting much but this was a really fun and
brutal opener.
Extant1979: I watched the InVasion PPV yesterday for the
first time. I have to admit, the Trish/Lita vs. Stacy/Torrie match was
fantastic. Not a technical masterpiece per se, but definitely very enjoyable on
a certain level.
Trish Stratus was secretly coming into her own long before
we picked up on it. Her excellent match against Stephanie at No Way Out 2001
was largely attributed to Steph, because nobody was ready to believe a fitness
model who had undergone plastic surgery could figure this wrestling business
out. Of course, she promptly shattered every stereotype, worked her ass off,
and went on to become the most revered female of the modern era.
daveschlet: Flair vs Steamboat from 3/18/89 Landover,
MD. It was an easy *****. Great match, looked like it was filmed in Fan Cam. No
commentary. Still amazing.
ETB757: Al Snow vs Chris Benoit on ECW TV. It’s easy
to forget how great a worker Snow was in his prime
Great match, right in the heart of the “Chris Benoit is a
cold sadistic killer” angle. Snow is his victim du jour, who eats a pile of
powerbombs while Benoit laughs about the damage to his neck. Actually … let’s
just move on.
cultstatus: Just watched BROCK/Rock for the first time
since I saw it live. Holy Christ that much doesn’t get the love it deserves.
It’s legit ***** and epic as fuck. Plus it’s great seeing the crowd turn
against Rock.
I loved Brock’s Rock Bottom out of nowhere, and his absolute
decapitation of Rocky right before the People’s Elbow. It’s telling just how
electric the whole building was, even after the energy that went into Triple
H/Michaels, and the fact they were in the Nassau coliseum which is
traditionally blah. The fans were beyond prepared to see the end of the Rock,
which set the seeds in motion for his heel turn in the spring of 2003 (which
was probably set in stone by RAW X, but I digress).
YankeesHoganTripleHFan:
The HHH/Cena/Edge Triple threat match
from Backlash 06. I didn’t see it until this year when my girlfriend got me the
HHH King of Kings dvd. I LOVED that match and thought it could have been the
main event at WM 22. Literally the entire ringside area was covered in Triple
H’s blood
Danimal Crossing:
Macho Man and Billy Jack Haynes wrestled
a couple of gems back in 86. The charisma is just off the charts. Not really a
talked about series of matches, but some great stuff I stumbled upon while
putting together Macho Man compilations in my spare time.
Mike Mears: Triple H/Cena from NOC ’08. Watching it now.
Never seen it before. Never quite had the epic feel they were going for- like
Cena/Batista would at Summerslam two months later- but a really good match.
Also features a rare moment of Cena losing cleanly. Granted,
we shouldn’t be SURPRISED seeing as Hunter’s involved, but it’s always
noteworthy when it happens. Those two have secretly great chemisty, and it’s
always in the air who’s going to win since both are bulletproof.
Lenny Vowels: I really enjoyed Savage vs. Michaels from
the European Tour in ’92, which I had never seen prior to the days of YouTube.
James: CM Punk vs. Rey Mysterio from Armageddon
’08. Can’t remember what spurred me to watching it but it was a pretty damn
good match.
This is also one of Rey’s last really good matches. He had
some standouts with Jericho, but his quality has decreased to the point I don’t
even really enjoy watching him anymore. His best asset was always his speed,
and was the only thing that made his size believable in terms of being a
threat.
joedust: Greg Valentine and Ron Garvin from the 1990
Royal Rumble. Great, stiff, match. Everytime I watch the 1990 Royal Rumble I
love it more and more.
I met Greg Valentine a couple of years ago, and asked him if
it’s true that it still takes him an hour in the ring just to get warmed up (as
Jesse liked to remind us). Valentine quipped: “It takes me an hour to get out
of bed.”
White Thunder: I randomly watched a Malenko – Guerrero
match from Hardcore TV on the network. Tremendous stuff.
Michael Weyer: Shawn Michaels vs Ric Flair, November 1991.
Shawn was still with the Rockers but showing his skills, good battle between
them, shows how Shawn always had the stuff to hang with Flair so well.
Shawn was always excellent, right from the word jump. While
anyone could have hung in there with Flair in 1991 and picked up a *** rating,
Shawn really worked to show what he was capable of doing on his own. His ring
work was stellar in any era.
Uncruisimatic_Buck_Nasty:
got the “best of tna 2007” dvd
from netflix and watched a good chunk of it last night. i’d never seen the
texas death match b/w james storm and braden walker, even though i’d heard of
its praises. DAYUM that was a bloody match. they both earned the kudos and
respect they got for working that bad boy.
These two had some of the most amazing chemistry I’ve ever
seen. The fact they were randomly paired together on one of the first TNA
shows, and somehow turned that into the run they had together was nothing short
of a miracle. I always felt it was Harris who was on the cusp of superstardom,
and I will never quite understand why he celebrated signing his WWE contract by
putting on 40 pounds – but James Storm didn’t let the same opportunity slide.
Their matches together were great, and the Texas Death Match was the pinnacle.
Violent as hell. Good pick.
greaterpower99: Randy Orton vs Christian at Summerslam 2011.
Wasn’t blown away the first time I saw it years ago and bought the disc mostly
for Cena-Punk 2 (which is better than their MITB match imho). Took another look
at it recently and honestly don’t know what I was thinking the first time as
it’s an awesome match.
You’re probably on the cusp of blasphemy saying anything
exceeded MITB#1. To the point about Orton/Christian, they fought a great series
and it was really unfortunate that Christian again went down with injury
because it looked like he had finally found his winning angle to be treated
seriously atop the WWE card.
jobber123: Dustin Rhodes vs Bunkhouse Buck at spring
stampede 94 is all kinds of awesome I hadnt see it until this morning.
Heavy boot stomping, blinding powder, Bionic elbows, and
Dustin bleeding like a faucet. Spring Stampede 1994 was the perfect precursor
to the insanity that was Slamboree (essentially an ECW-show airing out of
Philly), and these two put on a great old school display. I was a big fan of
Dustin taking off his belt and just whipping the piss out of Buck.
MC Hesher: I just watched the Savage/Warrior WM7 match
for the first time a few days ago. Epic atmosphere, and the match was also
pretty good. Warrior is fun to watch in HD, because his face is constantly
going “Crap, what spot’s next again? Is he clotheslining me or am I
clotheslining him? Am I hungry?”
thebraziliankid: Kane vs Albert, Both guys just went there
and had energetic 10 minutes match. Probably Kane’s best along with his first
Taker match.
I still have no idea where on earth this came from. Both
guys had been averaging one star bouts all year, woke up, ate their Wheaties,
and promptly killed it.
CruelConnectionNumber2:
The greatest random match I ever saw is
from a late 1991 WCW Main Event. Bischoff shows us an exclusive match from
Japan as the team of.. yes… JUSHIN THUNDER LIGER and OZ (Kevin Nash!) take on
SCOTT NORTON and MR. SAITO. LIGER and OZ is the most ridiculous team I’ve ever
heard of.
I positively love sheer ridiculousness like this. That’s
pretty hard to top from a “Who The Hell Booked THOSE Two Together???”
standpoint.
On the topic of Liger, I was recapping WCW Prime about a
year ago, when he put on an absolutely bitchin’ match with Shinjiro Ohtani. It
was only about 3 and a half minute long, but I rated it at ***1/2, because they
never stopped moving or coming up with creative ways to hurt each other.
Absolutely caught me off guard on a show known more for giving “Cobra”
somewhere to wrestle.
However, recently I was thumbing through a bunch of newly
acquired WCW Saturday Night episodes, and came across this one that I had never
seen before. I knew right away it was probably going to be good, but it was
even better than that. Enjoy, Steven Regal vs. Ricky Steamboat.
I hope you have a wonderful day, and we’ll be back at it
again tomorrow.