Jeff Jarrett Loves Promoting

Hey Scott,


Haven’t seen your thoughts yet on GFW. After a few live events, and more info on IMPACT, what do you make of all this?

I spoke with Jeff Jarrett before the upcoming live event in Erie about his relationship with TNA, his future in the ring, and Moose.


http://www.wrestledelphia.com/corrigans-corner-jeff-jarrett-gfw-founder/


Hope your readers enjoy!

Hey, Jeff’s a smart guy with lots of money to spend, so more power to him. He needed talent and somehow talked TNA into giving him guys for his roster under the guise of an invasion angle, so props to him. I don’t think his product will draw a dime, but if it means more NJ PPVs with English commentary, then go Slapnuts!

Place to Be Podcast Episode 353: Jeff Jarrett

In this episode of the Place to Be Podcast, Justin and Scott welcome in the one and only Jeff Jarrett! Jeff discusses the creation and future of Global Force Wrestling, Wrestle Kingdom #9, what keeps him energized in the business, his all time favorite wrestlers to watch and why the future of pro wrestling is bright.

Jeff also plays some wrestler name association and talks about his relationship with Owen Hart and Randy Savage, his NWA gimmick in 1998, his favorite promotor to work for, and whether or not he would ever return to WWE before wrapping with a fun nostalgic trip through his territory and early WWF days.

After that, Scott and Justin reveal their next interview guest!

So fire up this action-packed episode and join Scott and Justin because it is time for another edition of the PTB Podcast!

Place to Be Podcast Episode 353: Jeff Jarrett

July Classics: Shawn Michaels vs. Jeff Jarrett – In Your House 2

Fire up the Network for this one. I couldn’t find a good copy on the Youtubes or Dailymotion.

Jarrett came in as the Intercontinental Champion, and had just “performed” his hit single “With My Baby Tonight” earlier in the show. HBK was the red hot babyface. Arguably, the best match in 1995.

http://network.wwe.com/video/v31313113/milestone/31331363

Newsday story on Jeff Jarrett-Toby Keith, with comment from Jarrett

It’s Nashville Wrestling, where the lead babyface has a cheating wife, drives a Ford truck, and drinks a lot of beer!   
Come to think of it, that worked pretty well for another guy…

A Jeff Jarrett Question

In the Overrated Matches thread, the notion that during the Monday Night Wars Jeff Jarrett always jumped at the wrong time was brought up, which is a sentiment I’ve seen expressed quite a bit. Surely this isn’t the case?

 

He got out of the WWF in 96 when the company was struggling; spent a year in WCW when the nWo angle was at its hottest; headed back to the WWF just in time for the Attitude era; and, when it became apparent he was never going to break through the glass ceiling, jumped ship to WCW in 99, complete with a handsome payoff for dropping the Intercontinental title to Chyna. Admittedly, from there things went to hell until he started up TNA, but still, the timing of his jumps seems pretty sound to me, particularly from a financial perspective (I’m assuming that he must’ve made good money through October 1996 to October 1999, given that he was consistently pushed in the midcard/often holding some title or another, not to mention that WCW probably gave him more than he was worth in 99 to convince him to join). Considering what he’s achieved with TNA, isn’t Jarrett one of the greater success stories from the last fifteen years?

Really, a Jeff Jarrett question?  Is that still a thing?  Hey, whatever.

Anyway, yes, Jarrett is absolutely a case of someone achieving far beyond his talent level, no doubt.  He was lucky enough to be a name guy who was available during two different periods when the major promotions were looking for talent to raid, and his second WCW run gave him the World title he’d never have gotten under any other circumstances.  Unless it was him buying an entire promotion as a vanity project.

TNA is a different argument altogether, though.  I would like to once again point out what a giant financial failure on every level it was back in 2002 and continues to be.  The difference is that he now has Panda to finance the losses.  Were it not for Dixie Carter’s dad, TNA would have ceased to exist in 2002.  I really can’t count that as success, sorry.

A Jeff Jarrett Question

In the Overrated Matches thread, the notion that during the Monday Night Wars Jeff Jarrett always jumped at the wrong time was brought up, which is a sentiment I’ve seen expressed quite a bit. Surely this isn’t the case?

 

He got out of the WWF in 96 when the company was struggling; spent a year in WCW when the nWo angle was at its hottest; headed back to the WWF just in time for the Attitude era; and, when it became apparent he was never going to break through the glass ceiling, jumped ship to WCW in 99, complete with a handsome payoff for dropping the Intercontinental title to Chyna. Admittedly, from there things went to hell until he started up TNA, but still, the timing of his jumps seems pretty sound to me, particularly from a financial perspective (I’m assuming that he must’ve made good money through October 1996 to October 1999, given that he was consistently pushed in the midcard/often holding some title or another, not to mention that WCW probably gave him more than he was worth in 99 to convince him to join). Considering what he’s achieved with TNA, isn’t Jarrett one of the greater success stories from the last fifteen years?

Really, a Jeff Jarrett question?  Is that still a thing?  Hey, whatever.

Anyway, yes, Jarrett is absolutely a case of someone achieving far beyond his talent level, no doubt.  He was lucky enough to be a name guy who was available during two different periods when the major promotions were looking for talent to raid, and his second WCW run gave him the World title he’d never have gotten under any other circumstances.  Unless it was him buying an entire promotion as a vanity project.

TNA is a different argument altogether, though.  I would like to once again point out what a giant financial failure on every level it was back in 2002 and continues to be.  The difference is that he now has Panda to finance the losses.  Were it not for Dixie Carter’s dad, TNA would have ceased to exist in 2002.  I really can’t count that as success, sorry.

A Jeff Jarrett Question

In the Overrated Matches thread, the notion that during the Monday Night Wars Jeff Jarrett always jumped at the wrong time was brought up, which is a sentiment I’ve seen expressed quite a bit. Surely this isn’t the case?

 

He got out of the WWF in 96 when the company was struggling; spent a year in WCW when the nWo angle was at its hottest; headed back to the WWF just in time for the Attitude era; and, when it became apparent he was never going to break through the glass ceiling, jumped ship to WCW in 99, complete with a handsome payoff for dropping the Intercontinental title to Chyna. Admittedly, from there things went to hell until he started up TNA, but still, the timing of his jumps seems pretty sound to me, particularly from a financial perspective (I’m assuming that he must’ve made good money through October 1996 to October 1999, given that he was consistently pushed in the midcard/often holding some title or another, not to mention that WCW probably gave him more than he was worth in 99 to convince him to join). Considering what he’s achieved with TNA, isn’t Jarrett one of the greater success stories from the last fifteen years?

Really, a Jeff Jarrett question?  Is that still a thing?  Hey, whatever.

Anyway, yes, Jarrett is absolutely a case of someone achieving far beyond his talent level, no doubt.  He was lucky enough to be a name guy who was available during two different periods when the major promotions were looking for talent to raid, and his second WCW run gave him the World title he’d never have gotten under any other circumstances.  Unless it was him buying an entire promotion as a vanity project.

TNA is a different argument altogether, though.  I would like to once again point out what a giant financial failure on every level it was back in 2002 and continues to be.  The difference is that he now has Panda to finance the losses.  Were it not for Dixie Carter’s dad, TNA would have ceased to exist in 2002.  I really can’t count that as success, sorry.