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Goldberg vs. Hogan


Hey Scott, was there any reason why WCW gave away the Goldberg vs. Hogan title match on cable TV? Yeah, I'm sure it got a huge rating, but if they'd waited and put it on PPV it probably would have been the biggest buyrate they ever had in their history. Was there any reason for them putting such a highly anticipated title matchup on Nitro, other than "because WCW"?  

Yup, they basically wanted a huge rating to stem the bleeding, PPV revenue be damned.  What's really weird is that they never did a rematch on PPV and basically shunted Goldberg to the mid card as champion.  

Why does WWE want to sign Bill Goldberg?

Apparently WWE wants to sign Bill Goldberg to put him in WWE 2K15 and work Wrestlemania XXXI 

I get putting him into the video game because older fans play the games, but why bring him onto WWE TV?

The 12-and-under demographic of the fan base weren't born when Goldberg was a big deal in WCW. They weren't even watching during his last WWE run. To them, he will be just some screaming bald guy who they won't care about because he isn't John Cena. 

Any of the casual WCW viewers who popped for Goldberg's schtick in WCW likely stopped watching wrestling a long time ago. 

Nobody is pining to see Bill Goldberg wrestle anybody because it's been proven that he can't do anything but the standard 2-minute Bill Goldberg squash match. 

On top of that, he can't talk to save his life (one of the smart things WCW did at the beginning was make him a silent badass who came in, crushed jobbers, and left without saying a word).

What I'm trying to ask is, does Goldberg have any actual value left for any of the WWE audience beyond the smallest demographic (that being long-time wrestling fans who were watching WCW in 1998)?

Who would they put him against, and more importantly, why?

Because he sold a metric shit-ton of DVDs and people still chant his name at Ryback?  Seems pretty easy to me.  

Cucch’s Book Review: Goldberg: I’m Next

Well, you figure a book with writing credits lauded to Scott Keith and fellow baseball wonk Rob Neyer would lead to a great book.

No.
Bill Goldberg is a wrestling anomaly. He is someone who trained quickly and in short order became a superstar that defies description. Many have called him WCW’s Austin clone. Some have called him WCW’s Shamrock clone. The fact of the matter is that Goldberg is no one’s clone. Goldberg was GOLDBERG, and the quicker we accept that fact, the quicker we can accept and appreciate what a once in a lifetime talent Goldberg was.

Goldberg’s biography, much like his career arc, is totally different. This book was written in 2000, after the peak of his career. (12 years later, I think I can state that.). Goldberg was an absolute phenomenon, one of those human events that just sort of happen out of nowhere. WCW did a remarkable job in booking Billy Boy. He was a sensation. Spear, jackhammer, powermove, pin. That was the Goldberg equation.

His book, as sad as I am to say, is total rubbish. He starts with his horrible groin injury in the NFL, and then goes into his WCW career, as started by Sting. Now, I LOVE hearing about wrestlers starting from nothing and then making something of them. Big Billy does none of that. His book starts with him taking methadone to power through injury. He then goes through some, SOME, of his matches and then  mentions Make-A-Wish, which is an excellent foundation. But Goldy often glosses over periods of his career, and that is something this scribe does not care for. Basically, Goldberg treats his career as an also ran, a piece de resistance that makes him seem like some dude off the street who fancies notoriety as opposed to a well earned rep as a good wrestler who competes in good matches.

Now, I would like to mention that this book leads me to a well informed, well educated point, but the fact is it does not. Goldberg took advantage of his name and published this shittastic book. Read it at your own peril. I will say this: If you are a 1998 mark of the business, this is your book.. Otherwise, its rubbish.

Goldberg v. Hogan

Scott, Revisionist history is a wonderful thing in wrestling.  It allows people to blindly say “this caused this” and “Vince wanted such and such” even though that person may have been 4 years old at the time when it happened.   But more importantly, it allows people to be over-praised or, by the same token, over-bashed for certain things.

So the other day I was thinking of the infamous Goldberg/Hogan match from Nitro in July 1998.   Yes we can all agree that should have been a PPV match.   But in specific regards to both individuals, there are some things I felt beared mentioning: In regards to Hogan.   Hogan gets bashed for never truly “making” anyone.  They mention how he dicked around with the Sting/Hogan StarrCade ending…..or how he immediately got the belt back from Luger  at Road Wild that time.   All of that is true, and I’m not saying Hogan doesn’t deserve SOME of the reputation he had. But does it seem that Hogan doesn’t get enough credit for making Goldberg?  Goldberg was a guy who had basically beaten jobbers, mid-carders, and NWO B-teamers for a year, before finally beating Raven for the US title.   He was clearly the hottest thing in WCW at that time.  And in one night….in front of his home-state crowd…….Goldberg CLEANLY defeated, IN THE SAME NIGHT, Scott Hall and Hulk Hogan (2 out of the 3 guys who changed the landscape of pro wrestling in the late ’90s with the NWO angle) to win the WCW Heavyweight title to go along with his U.S. title.   Look at that from a mark perspective:  he already, in theory, had been weakened by having to wrestle Scott Hall previously…then went on to cleanly defeat “The Immortal” Hollywood Hulk Hogan, brother. What more could have been done to put Goldberg over that night?  Maybe they could have filmed a vignette of him saving 50 orphans from a burning building after his match with Hall, only to crawl to the ring “just in time” for the Hoganmatch after refusing medical treatment for excessive smoke inhalation, followed by a spear and a jackhammer? Anyway, point is….people who bash Hogan for not really “doing the right thing for business” (again, some may be justifiable)  like to forget that he put over the hottest commodity in Pro Wrestling NOT named Steve Austin,  when he was at his absolute hottest point in terms of marketability and general fan interest  (I’ve always said that Spring and Summer of 1998 was one of the absolutely best points in pro wrestling history,  in terms of WCW, WWF and even ECW all being in demand) So that brings me to Bill Goldberg: The only thing anybody ever mentions about Goldberg is that “Nash killed WCW blah blah blah by pinning Goldberg”.   Don’t really care about all that, this isn’t about Nash. But in 1998,  WCW began their back-and-forth tug of war with WWF for ratings.  WCW won basically the first quarter of the year….WWF finally won in April,  but even April and May was sorta back and forth between WCW/WWF.  Finally in June, WWF started winning every week (though ratings were still pretty close).   Finally, WCW won again the night Goldberg won the title on July 6th.   They didn’t, however, win again until the months of August and September….when WCW brought in the Warrior and did the Horseman Reunion.   But after that, WCW would ultimately only win once more..that being October 26th. So I said all that to say this……is it possible that Goldberg doesn’t catch enough flack for MAYYYYYBBBE not being quite the “draw” that people like to paint him out to be?   He had the title put on him at one of the hottest times in pro wrestling history (so people can’t bitch about how “business was down” during his run),  he held the belt for 6 months (so it’s not like he wasn’t given a somewhat lengthy run),  and he beat the absolute biggest name in pro wrestling history to win that belt  (and Hogan never “got his win back”, either). So to sum all that up….1.  Was Hogan not given enough credit for “making” Goldberg?  and 2.  Does revisionist history paint Goldberg as being more of a long-term draw than he really was or would have been?

  First of all, can you phrase this in a way that involves Daniel Bryan, because the site is doing record-shattering numbers thus far this weekend and I’d like to continue that. 1.  Hogan may have put Goldberg over, but who was main eventing at the very next PPV?   Hogan.  And at Road Wild?  Hogan.  He may have been the champion, but he had no opportunity to be the top guy in the promotion.  2. Goldberg had an incredibly high Q rating, which is basically a measurement of celebrity, higher even than Steve Austin in 1998.  So yes, he was a really big celebrity at the time and WCW was the only promotion stupid enough to piss it away. 

Goldberg

Scott,
It’s 1998 in WCW…If you had to choose one, re: Goldberg’s streak:
1. End it before he gets the title–Someone beats him, he regroups to decimate the nWo, and claims his first World Title.
2. End it via screwjob, build to rematch mercy-killing–something like the Nash loss, but with a satisfying blowoff victory in the rematch.
3. End it clean–ala Hogan-Warrior, building another star in the process. Either an established guy like Sting or a new star-in-waiting ends his streak.
4. The Bobby Heenan Plan–have him NEVER lose.
Was there a ‘right’ way to go about things, or did they just book themselves into a corner with Goldberg’s streak and title reign?

If they limited his wrestling appearances to PPV main events, he never needed to lose.  The money wasn’t in finding someone who could beat him, it was in people paying to watch him destroy people.  Had they kept legitimate numbers for the streak and not overexposed him, they could have rode that horse for years.  So I’m going with the Brain on this one. 

Goldberg

Scott,
It’s 1998 in WCW…If you had to choose one, re: Goldberg’s streak:
1. End it before he gets the title–Someone beats him, he regroups to decimate the nWo, and claims his first World Title.
2. End it via screwjob, build to rematch mercy-killing–something like the Nash loss, but with a satisfying blowoff victory in the rematch.
3. End it clean–ala Hogan-Warrior, building another star in the process. Either an established guy like Sting or a new star-in-waiting ends his streak.
4. The Bobby Heenan Plan–have him NEVER lose.
Was there a ‘right’ way to go about things, or did they just book themselves into a corner with Goldberg’s streak and title reign?

If they limited his wrestling appearances to PPV main events, he never needed to lose.  The money wasn’t in finding someone who could beat him, it was in people paying to watch him destroy people.  Had they kept legitimate numbers for the streak and not overexposed him, they could have rode that horse for years.  So I’m going with the Brain on this one.