Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Changing Minds

Scott, Have you ever changed your opinion of a match after hearing that one of the wrestlers in it didn’t think it was that good? As examples, Jericho didn’t think his match with Benoit and Angle at Wrestlemania 2000 was very good, and Flair wrote in his autobiography that the match where he dropped the belt to Bret Hart was “terrible.” Did reading those comments make you reconsider those matches, or is it one of those “eye of the beholder” things where you don’t need Radiohead to like “Creep” for you to like “Creep?”

That’s actually the only Radiohead song I do like.  Anyway, wrestlers, like most creative people, are extremely judgmental of their own work, moreso than any other critic could be.  Excepting of course Kevin Nash who thinks everything he shits is gold.  I know that when I’m reading my old rants for the “Scott sez” redoes I’ll be like “This is the most embarrassingly bad horseshit I’ve ever read” despite people telling me how they love to read my old stuff.  So yeah, oddly enough the opinions of the actual wrestlers are often the least important to me when judging a match.  Plus they would often judge the matches on insanely inside and technical aspects that you’re never going to notice as a common fan anyway (“And then here he’s doing a hammerlock when the previous three armdrags clearly foreshadowed a wristlock…”).  If you ever hear Bret Hart, as an example, talk about his own matches that’s kind of what it sounds like at times.  I can also picture Kurt Angle sitting in front of a TV and picking apart his own matches at 3:00AM while hopped up on painkillers, trying to make sure that he doesn’t ruin the next match by grabbing his back with his left hand instead of his right when selling a bodyslam or something. 

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!

Plug-A-Thon 3!

Hi guys, thought I’d pass this along:
In the latest edition of “Part of the Universe” with theScore’s Arda Ocal, ESPN SportsCenter anchor Robert Flores describes the relationship between WWE and ESPN in terms of former talent working there (Jonathan Coachman and Todd Grisham), how being a fan of WWE is perceived in the building, and when WWE highlights would ever make SportsCenter (including Flores wanting Kofi Kingston’s hand walk elimination dodge at the 2012 Rumble to be part of that evening’s “Top Ten”)
You can listen to the entire interview here: http://blogs.thescore.com/wwe/2012/02/02/part-of-the-universe-6-robert-flores/
Thank you!

You’re welcome!