QOTD 70: Once More, With Feeling.

Ha. Figures I get free time, so I figure why not, right?Also it’s an excuse to post my first ever concert review! If you hate this, blame White Thunder who said to do it.

What’s the best live show you’ve ever been too? Music, Theatre, Wrestling? What blew you away about it live that you didn’t expect? 


For me, it was a bunch of Celtic fiddlers. Seriously, fiddle me timbers! It was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle super-group Childsplay, I immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington, Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one, with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing. Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later, Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful ‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman, the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning, gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have, and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself, there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word, it would be…Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer. But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless. 

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension, is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me. So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go. Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done. It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s, Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play. …As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia. …With a golden fiddle.

Well
fiddle me timbers! This was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon
learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle supergroup Childsplay, I
immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how
some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington,
Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The
location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one,
with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was
similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing
with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle
people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about
it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about
this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing.
Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean
jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you
have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later,
Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether
that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped
that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with
a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s
something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From
there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original
compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a
stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the
performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa
Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and
gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special
treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful
‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman,
the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning,
gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that
Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were
eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some
time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start
to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went
straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they
were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as
its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have,
and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself,
there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained
ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word,
it wouldd be: Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle
sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all
together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at
the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to
a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer.
But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless.  

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension,
is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they
enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it
out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King
Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film
like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it
live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the
pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains
of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s
once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how
this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me.
So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go.
Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as
the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done.
It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or
all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it
made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before
my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own
food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done
involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a
guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty
lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which
point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s,
Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio
options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the
sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude
between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that
only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to
choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw
earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play.

…As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

…With a golden fiddle. – See more at:
http://bostoneventsinsider.com/2013/12/review-fiddle-virtuosos-childs.html#sthash.fD3Lm961.dpuf

Well
fiddle me timbers! This was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon
learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle supergroup Childsplay, I
immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how
some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington,
Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The
location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one,
with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was
similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing
with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle
people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about
it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about
this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing.
Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean
jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you
have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later,
Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether
that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped
that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with
a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s
something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From
there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original
compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a
stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the
performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa
Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and
gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special
treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful
‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman,
the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning,
gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that
Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were
eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some
time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start
to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went
straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they
were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as
its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have,
and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself,
there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained
ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word,
it wouldd be: Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle
sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all
together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at
the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to
a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer.
But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless.  

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension,
is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they
enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it
out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King
Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film
like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it
live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the
pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains
of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s
once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how
this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me.
So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go.
Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as
the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done.
It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or
all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it
made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before
my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own
food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done
involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a
guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty
lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which
point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s,
Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio
options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the
sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude
between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that
only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to
choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw
earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play.

…As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

…With a golden fiddle. – See more at:
http://bostoneventsinsider.com/2013/12/review-fiddle-virtuosos-childs.html#sthash.fD3Lm961.dpuf

Well
fiddle me timbers! This was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon
learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle supergroup Childsplay, I
immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how
some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington,
Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The
location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one,
with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was
similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing
with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle
people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about
it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about
this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing.
Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean
jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you
have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later,
Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether
that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped
that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with
a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s
something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From
there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original
compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a
stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the
performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa
Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and
gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special
treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful
‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman,
the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning,
gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that
Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were
eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some
time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start
to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went
straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they
were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as
its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have,
and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself,
there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained
ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word,
it wouldd be: Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle
sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all
together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at
the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to
a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer.
But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless.  

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension,
is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they
enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it
out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King
Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film
like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it
live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the
pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains
of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s
once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how
this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me.
So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go.
Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as
the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done.
It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or
all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it
made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before
my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own
food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done
involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a
guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty
lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which
point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s,
Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio
options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the
sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude
between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that
only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to
choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw
earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play.

…As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

…With a golden fiddle. – See more at:
http://bostoneventsinsider.com/2013/12/review-fiddle-virtuosos-childs.html#sthash.fD3Lm961.dpuf

Well
fiddle me timbers! This was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon
learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle supergroup Childsplay, I
immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how
some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington,
Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The
location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one,
with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was
similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing
with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle
people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about
it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about
this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing.
Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean
jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you
have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later,
Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether
that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped
that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with
a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s
something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From
there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original
compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a
stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the
performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa
Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and
gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special
treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful
‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman,
the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning,
gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that
Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were
eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some
time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start
to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went
straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they
were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as
its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have,
and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself,
there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained
ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word,
it wouldd be: Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle
sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all
together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at
the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to
a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer.
But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless.  

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension,
is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they
enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it
out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King
Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film
like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it
live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the
pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains
of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s
once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how
this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me.
So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go.
Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as
the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done.
It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or
all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it
made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before
my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own
food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done
involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a
guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty
lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which
point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s,
Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio
options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the
sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude
between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that
only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to
choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw
earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play.

…As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

…With a golden fiddle. – See more at:
http://bostoneventsinsider.com/2013/12/review-fiddle-virtuosos-childs.html#sthash.fD3Lm961.dpuf

Well
fiddle me timbers! This was great. Fiddle lickin’ good, even! Upon
learning of the 21-member-strong Fiddle supergroup Childsplay, I
immediately went about informing all my friends and family about how
some of the best fiddlers in the world would be performing in Lexington,
Massachusetts. Having no takers, I went by myself.

The
location, at Lexington’s Masonic Heritage Museum is an intimate one,
with a capacity of probably a few hundred, tops. The whole venture was
similar. There was a painting of George Washington on the wall posing
with his palms outstretched downwards as if to say “settle, settle
people, we’re here to have a good time, but lets not get crazy about
it,”. Everyone in the audience seemed to know each other, talking about
this guy they used to know or that girl they heard did that thing.
Families were dressed in their Thursday evening second best. Clean
jeans, polo shirts, and holiday dresses were the order of the day.

At one point a little girl ran up to her dad saying “Dad! Do you
have any money? They have Chanukah music!”. Come to find out later,
Hanukkah (spelled Hanneke) is the name of one of the fiddlers – whether
that kid was a superfan or about to be a little confused when she popped
that CD into her walkman, I’ll never know.

The show starts with
a humorous number that I don’t dare ruin, save to say that it’s
something legendary cartoon voice Mel Blanc would be proud of. From
there, Childsplay fiddled their hearts out, mixing in original
compositions with pieces older than the country I live in.

The fiddles were of course the focus, but the inclusion of a
stand up bass, drums, flutes, and vocals added welcome layers to the
performance. Those compositions with vocals performed by Lissa
Schneckenburger, including the haunting ‘Dear Companion’ and
gut-punchingly relevant ‘Leave No Millionaire Behind’ were a special
treat that kept the show dynamic and fresh. Toss in a wonderful
‘handbone’ performance by the very-possibly-Santa-Claus Steve Hickman,
the occasional piano accompaniment, and dancing from the stunning,
gosh-I-wonder-if-she’s-single Shannon Dunne, and it was apparent that
Childsplay was keenly aware of the one criticism I do have, and were
eager to subvert it.

What is that criticism? That after some
time, to a layman like myself, the swaying, oscillating notes can start
to sound a little familiar. In fact, on more than one occasion they went
straight into a second or third song in a set and I had no clue they
were playing a different tune, which is forgiven almost as quickly as
its thought of because of the musical command the artists on stage have,
and the fact that for someone with more musical knowledge than myself,
there’s likely worlds of difference between the songs that my untrained
ear hadn’t noticed.

If I had to sum Childsplay up in one word,
it wouldd be: Precision. At one point, I took notice of the fiddle
sticks swaying back and forth in perfect unison. Up and down, all
together. Up and down a little less. Up and hold. All together, all at
the same time. If you closed your eyes you’d think you were listening to
a CD that had been produced and tweaked to perfection by a producer.
But no. It was all there, all live, and flawless.  

Fiddle music, or as I like to call it violin without pretension,
is something I imagine most folks have a passing interest in – they
enjoy it when they hear it, but don’t spend a lot of time seeking it
out. The kind of tunes that you’d hear at a medieval festival like King
Richard’s Faire, or during a party scene in a historical or fantasy film
like Titanic or A Knight’s Tale or The Lord of The Rings. Seeing it
live makes you want to seek it out.

Considering my own musical tastes lie in the world of the
pop-rock stylings of Barenaked Ladies, Bowling for Soup, and Fountains
of Wayne, the offensive-but-near-genius output of Eminem, and Kid Rock’s
once rap, once rock, now country-rock deep tracks, I was unsure how
this music I’d never heard live, that didn’t have lyrics, would grab me.
So of course It grabbed me with both hands and wouldn’t let go.
Childsplay now goes onto my various playlists along with James Taylor as
the music I’ll enjoy while thinking or writing or getting stuff done.
It energizes your subconscious while forcing you to tap a single toe or
all five.

The best compliment I can give Childsplay is that it
made me nostalgic for a time I would truly hate living in. A time before
my precious laptop and fancy iPhone, a time when you cooked your own
food and milked your own cow, when the idea of a harvest well done
involved a barn, a few hay bales, a keg of ale, folks on the fiddle, a
guy slapping his knees to keep the beat, and if you’re lucky, a pretty
lass or two dancing to the tunes until their legs grew tired, at which
point someone else would step in, keeping time.

For all our MP3s,
Youtube music videos, concert festivals, and streaming ‘Pandora’ radio
options, nothing feels quite like this show did. The fullness of the
sound, the laid-back atmosphere, the dancing, the mutual gratitude
between audience and the performers – it touches your soul in a way that
only the best live music does. I’m not kidding when I say if I had to
choose between seeing Child’s Play or The Rolling Stones (whom I saw
earlier this year) again, I would choose Child’s Play.

…As long as they promised to play The Devil Went Down to Georgia.

…With a golden fiddle. – See more at:
http://bostoneventsinsider.com/2013/12/review-fiddle-virtuosos-childs.html#sthash.fD3Lm961.dpuf

A+ Match of the Day

We continue with TLC week here at the Blog O’Doom and we’ll go for something a little different this time.

Before Hogan arrived, 1994 was becoming a pretty special year for WCW in terms of workrate. I don’t know if they were making much money (probably not) but the PPVs were pretty solid as guys started being booked to their strengths.

None of that was more evident than the 1994 Spring Stampede when The Nasty Boys took on Cactus Jack and Maxx Payne in a street fight that set the tone for some of the wild brawls you would see over the next several years. Enjoy this one and check out that pop for Cactus Jack!

QOTD format…

While Meekin was MIA, a few people had the idea of going to a rotating weekly writer for the QOTD.  This would give it a new voice and diverse interests to explore every week, keep it fresh, and give everyone a chance to be a contributer here.  It will continue to keep a non wrestling thread up everyday also, an idea lots of people seem to support.

With Meekin officially gone now (sadface), Scott has approved this idea so it’s good to go.  
Thoughts?   Any way to improve it?  Any volunteers right off the bat?  I feel the easiest mechanism would be for the volunteer to write it daily and email it to me to post so I can just cut and paste it in.

I’m not gonna write any so volunteer contributers are crucial.  I’ve seen people express interests in other threads…

BoD Daily Update

WWE.com RAW Preview


http://www.wwe.com/shows/raw/2013-12-09/five-point-preview-26168561

AJ Styles Leaving TNA?


AJ’s contract expires on 12/16 and he is already begun to accept independent bookings. AJ apparently finished up with the company during the last TV taping. AJ and TNA were very far apart in terms of money, which had been the issue the entire time. AJ also has his autobiography, which is scheduled to be released in the first quarter of 2014.

Credit Mike Johnson, PWInsider.com






WrestleMania 31 Will be in Santa Clara, CA


The event will be held at Levi Stadium, the future home of the San Francisco 49ers.

http://www.wwe.com/shows/wrestlemania/levis-stadium-to-host-wrestlemania-31-26168855

Tag Team to Turn Heel Soon?


There is word that the team of Brodus Clay and Tensai will be turning heel and possibly pushed as a top heel team. The WWE wanted to turn them and the Funkadactyls heel a while ago but the production company begged them not to, as they wanted the girls to be faces on TV due to “Total Divas.”

Credit Bryan Alvarez, Figure Four Weekly Newsletter






Solomon Crowe Makes his NXT Debut


Crowe, the former Sami Callahan, made his debut when he attacked Kalisto, the former Samuray Del Sol. Crowe’s gimmick is that of an evil hacker.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5m4p8_0I8k

QOTD 69: Goodnight, and Good Luck

If you haven’t noticed, I’ve been sort of MIA for….I’d have to check. It feels like awhile. Anyway, I’ve gotten a second full time job doing events writing and promotion for Boston Events Insider, which is a gig that’s paying me to write, do research, and attend all kinds of crazy stuff. It’s like the gig I had for Roger Ebert on crack.


Thus: What are your favorite finales? 


 
So, with a…somewhat heavy heart I must take my leave of the QOTD duties, hell, I haven’t even had the time to check this blog in a few weeks. I guess we’re back to Orton / Cena, wrestling wise? I think? Who knows. 

Anyway, I wanted to say thanks to everyone who responded to the QOTDs, praised it, hated it, whatever. It was the first time I ever had a real audience of people who would respond to whatever I would write. We all learned so much about each other over these past months, and I like to think we’ve grown as a community. We’re not just wrestling fans, we’re…I don’t want to say the word friends because we’re on the internet, but fuck it, I’ll say it, we’re friends. Hell, Caliber and I talk on Facebook every few days, so yeah. Friends.

I’ve mentioned it before, but being able to do this QOTD daily (mostly daily) has given me the ability to write every.single.day, which is fantastic. Now I’m writing every single day professionally, and I don’t think I’d have it in me if it wasn’t for you kind folks. Posing questions I have, having my opinions validated or invalidated, has been the kind of experience that is invaluable.


So, Thank You, Blog Otters. 

I’m sure I’ll pop in occasionally, with a review, quip, or even the occasional, way-too-long-form question if I find the time. Hopefully someone takes up the challenge of doing a daily one of these, because I think they give people a chance to talk and converse and discuss their lives in a way they really can’t anywhere else. 

Here, I’ll do it in song.

That said, now it’s time to give shit away. If you live in New England, I have more tickets to give away than I can count – well I can count, but it’s more fun if I say it that way. Find me on facebook – facebook.com/pmeekin, twitter (@meekinonmovies), or just e-mail the [email protected] e-mail directly, and check out bostoneventsinsider.com to see the kind of ish we’re doling out. The coolest giveaway is currently for something called ‘The Slutcracker’ which is probably exactly what you think it is.

Even if you don’t live in New England, find me on facebook. I’m friendly!

Now what you’re really here for:

Bye! See you around!

A+ Match of the Day: TLC Week

We’re going to take a week break from the Royal Rumbles to do a TLC week leading into this likely shitty PPV.

Not all the A+ matches will be TLC matches but each will have at least a table, ladder or chair as a major part of the fray.

So we’ll start this week off with a more recent oldie but goodie as we go one year into the wayback machine for the first-ever six-man TLC match as Ryback and Team Hell No took on The Shield in their official debut match. Enjoy.

Rib on Triple H

>

> Hey Scott,

>

> The other day I got sucked into the internet rabbit hole reading up on the Macho Man/Stephanie McMahon rumors leading to Macho being blackballed from WWE. Meltzer has said that most of the WWE higher-ups have repeated and believe the story, which leads him to believe that it is true.

>

> If that's the case, do you think CM Punk wearing the Macho Man tights and doing the elbow drop is a subtle rib on Triple H or Vince? I know Punk likes to pay tribute to deceased wrestlers, but this type of subtle needling seems like his cup of tea. Thoughts?

>

Eh? Dave has said many times before that there's probably nothing to the rumours. Punk is just a big fan of Savage, like all right-thinking people are.

Big angle at TLC

Hey Scott,

Surely there’s no chance we’re getting two straight 3-on-1 handicap matches at TLC? Do you expect some kind of big angle to play out – possibly Bryan turning and joining up with the Wyatts? 

Turning him heel at the height of his popularity and having him join a midcard faction would be rather stupid to say the least.  

Rare Match of the Day

Here is a match that took place on January 22nd, 2002. This was from the same taping in which AJ wrestled the Hurricane on Metal. AJ was offered a developmental deal after the taping but declined, as he did not want to relocate with his wife in college. Anyway, the match is pretty good and it was not hard to see why the WWE would offer him a deal after the tapings. It also shows you how they absolutely wasted Rico when they recalled him to the roster as a stylist.

FULL-LENGTH PPV MATCH – SummerSlam 2011 – John Cena vs. CM Punk – Undisp…

WWE’s official YouTube account states that both Cena and Punk walked into SummerSlam as WWE Champion. That’s almost as good as if it were stated on the WWE App (a new way to watch television!).


Nothing will ever be as good as being on the WWE App.  NOTHING.  

Two years later and I still don’t even get what the purpose of the finish was supposed to be.  HHH screws over Cena for some reason and ends up in a feud with Punk over Nash texting himself?  

Match was ****1/2, by the way, for those who have asked since I’ve never ranted on the show before.  

BoD Daily Update

AJ Styles Gone From TNA 


AJ will be finished with the company when his contract expires on 12/16 and made his last appearance for the company at this past TV taping. AJ has already started to accept independent bookings and will have his autobiography released in early 2014. AJ and TNA were far apart in terms of money, which was the reason for his departure.

Credit Mike Johnson, PWInsider.com

Tag Team to Turn Heel Soon?


There is a plan to turn Brodus Clay and Tensai into a top heel team. The WWE originally wanted the team and the Funkadacyls to turn heel but the production team talked them out of it due to them wanting to keep the girls faces for “Total Diva’s”

Credit Bryan Alvarez, Figure Four Newsletter






Solomon Crowe Makes his NXT Debut


Crowe, who wrestled as Sami Callahan on the independent scene, made his debut at an NXT show, attacking Kalisto, the former Samuray Del Sol. Crowe’s gimmick is that of an evil hacker. Below is the link of his debut.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5m4p8_0I8k






WWF Livewire 96- Russo, McMahon, Cornette, Heyman etc – great video

Hi Scott,

Hope all is well!  I wanted to share this video with the blog o' doom.
I hadn't seen this since it aired live in the fall of 1996 but it's so fascinating watching all these personalities on one live show (WWF Livewire on USA).


You have Cornette and Russo shooting on each other, Sunny ripping Sable legit, McMahon talking dirt on Bischoff, Ross, Turner, and his thoughts on a WWF Network Channel (in 96), and even a call from Paul Heyman claiming his concepts are being stolen. Such a nice blend of shoot and fabrication in a very stale 96. It is awkward but compelling tv before they decided to finally strip things down and get edgy with Raw is War in 97.  

Oh man, the Paul Heyman audio run-in was EPIC.  Didn't he do a fake name once too, calling in as "Bruce P. from Hartford" or something like that?  Good times.

80's Wrestling Entrance Themes

Hey Scott, hope all is well.
 
I was burning some time away on a Saturday night on You Tube (for all of those with young kids, you will understand) contemplating my favorite WWE entrance theme ever.  I got into some old ones from the 80’s (Demolition, Strike Force, Hogan, Warrior, the old Hart Foundation, etc.), and then ran across one gem, the Rougeau Brothers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIFhXX12-PI).  It got me thinking about their characters and their run in the old WWF, but how in the world were these guys not given an opportunity with the Tag-Team titles?!?!?  With Jimmy Hart, those handheld American flags they would carry to the ring, their squirrely promos, and the fact that both  Jacques and Raymond Rougeau could go in the ring (their finishing move was the tits), I just don’t understand how Vince didn’t give them a shot.  You may have addressed this previously, but I thought they both could be huge heels prior to  Raymond Rougeau becoming the Mountie.  Any thoughts?
 
 
Jacques was the Mountie, Raymond was the dorky announcer.
 
And technically they DID win the tag titles in Toronto (or maybe Montreal, I forget which) from the Harts in 87, but it was returned on a technicality.  I guess based on the flimsy whims of the blog, THAT would be a unification too.  OH YEAH I WENT THERE.
 
Honestly, in today’s climate, they totally would have gotten a run with the belts in the All American Boys period.  Although by late 88 Jacques’ back was pretty shot and he was out for a long time during their hottest period.  But really, are you gonna put them over DEMOLITION in 1988?  I think not.  Any other team unlucky enough to be in title contention during that reign was pretty much SOL.
 

Edit:  Oddly, just after this e-mail, someone ELSE sent me THIS one… Scott, Thought this was interesting. Quoting from The Rougeaus’ Wikipedia entry: “The Rougeaus actually won the WWF Tag Team Championship on August 10, 1987 at the Forum, defeating The Hart Foundation. Jimmy Hart, the Hart Foundation’s manager, tried to interfere on their behalf with his signature foreign object, a megaphone. The megaphone was intercepted by the Rougeaus, who used it to get the pin and win the titles. They were announced as the new tag team champions, but the decision was later reversed and their title win is not recognized by the WWE.” And here’s footage of the win: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzGQ1o4P4Hw

Cucch’s Non-Wrestling Query of the Evening.

So I am working a crazy ass busy holiday season at a very populated mall, one that I more or less feed as the rest of the stores deal with the unwashed undead masses looking for their Stop Touching Me Elmo dolls. The thread here is obviously South Park. What I want to know is this: Where do you rank the last 4 weeks of South Park in the pantheon of great South Park episodes? Personally, I found it utterly hysterical. It was weekly episodic television that I made damn sure to DVR, unlike a certain Monday night show that I have all but given up upon after twenty years of devoted viewership. But here are the two questions: How do you view these “Black Friday” South Park episodes, and what is YOUR favorite South Park episode all time?

Thunder – July 16, 1998

Thunder
Date:
July 16, 1998
Location:
Oakland Arena, Oakland, California
Attendance:
13,393
Commentators:
Mike Tenay, Lee Marshall, Bobby Heenan, Tony Schiavone
Reviewed by Tommy Hall
I
can’t believe I’m saying this but Hogan is one of the best things
about WCW right now. He was evil again on Monday instead of being
the guy who takes nothing seriously. That being said, he really
doesn’t seem to mind that he’s lost the world title. His reaction on
Monday was basically “Eh, I’ll get back to that when I have time.”
That doesn’t do anything for the title but that never seemed to be a
priority in WCW. Let’s get to it.

Apparently
this is a three hour show. Oh freaking joy.
Speaking
of three hours, weren’t we supposed to see Hogan vs. Goldberg in its
entirety again on Monday? I guess not being able to remember a
promise you made five days earlier is a universal problem in
wrestling.
We
open with a Nash interview from after Nitro went off the air Monday.
He says he isn’t pleased with what Hall did and calls it strike two.
It’s all Hogan’s fault of course, but Nash is going to have to knock
some sense into Hall. Tenay is conducting the interview and spends
most of it sucking up to the Outsiders because WCW now supports the
Wolfpack I guess.
Konnan
vs. El Dandy
Konnan
raps on the way to the ring and sucks up to the Oakland crowd. Dandy
is quickly taken down and stomped on a bit before he comes back with
a clothesline. An abdominal stretch has Konnan in trouble but he
dares to doubt El Dandy. Konnan flapjacks him down and it’s the 187
into the Tequila Sunrise for the easy win.
Road
Wild ad.
Ultimo
Dragon vs. Lizmark Jr.
This
is going to be a long three hours. Dragon fires off the kicks to
start and does his headstand in the corner before kicking Lizmark in
the chest. Lizmark chops him a bit and gets a nice belly to back
suplex to set up an abdominal stretch on the mat. Back up and a
tilt-a-whirl backbreaker gets two for Lizmark. The nitwit fans are
booing this. A rollup and fallaway slam get two each on Dragon as
this has almost been one sided. Lizmark’s Lionsault hits legs though
and both guys are down. Back up and Lizmark tries a Samoan drop of
all things, only to have Dragon land on his feet and hook the Dragon
Sleeper for the win.
Rating:
C. Better match than I expected
here as Lizmark got to show off. Dragon is on his way out of the
company at this point so maybe that’s why he was on defense so long
out there. It wasn’t anything that was going to set the world on
fire but I can think of worse ways to spend four and a half minutes.
The
announcers talk about DDP and Hennig not happening last week but
they’ll try to do it tonight instead.
Here’s
Page to talk about how much he hates Hogan and his ego. He’s right
here if Hogan wants to jump him, but tonight it’s Hennig that will
feel the BANG. Short stuff from Page tonight.
The
next Thunder isn’t for three weeks. I think that’s a Christmas
miracle.
Public
Enemy vs. Alex Wright/Disco Inferno
Rock
cranks on Wright’s arm to start but gets backdropped out to the
floor. He doesn’t seem all that hurt but Wright sends him back
inside anyway. Rocco’s superplex attempt is countered into a front
suplex off the top for two as Rocco still doesn’t seem that bothered.
Off to Disco vs. Grunge with Inferno getting punched all over the
ring. Wright walks into a tilt-a-whirl slam as Public Enemy throws
in a table. Tokyo Magnum tries to come in for a save but gets
crushed against the table. Alex uses the distraction to grab a
neckbreaker on Grunge for the pin.
Rating:
D+. Believe it or not this
hasn’t been a horrible feud. There’s a nice idea with the goofy guys
facing the brawlers and it’s actually working. The matches haven’t
been anything of note but I haven’t been bored when watching them.
That’s more than I can say about a lot of WCW matches and feuds.
Post
match Meng comes out and destroys everyone in sight. Barbarian comes
out to try and stop Meng but gets a Death Grip for his efforts. Meng
destroys even more people.
Dean
Malenko vows to get his hands on Jericho soon enough. Tony asks him
about Arn Anderson helping him out at Bash at the Beach. Dean says
he’ll talk to Arn before he leaves tonight.
Jim
Duggan vs. Roadblock
A
quick (work with me here) clothesline put the 400lb+ Roadblock on the
floor but he elbows Duggan in the jaw back inside. The big man hits
some forearms to the back like any good clubbing monster would before
Duggan clotheslines him out again. Back in and the ten right hands
in the corner have Roadblock in trouble but he grabs a bearhug to
slow Duggan down. Jim breaks free, hits the Three Point Clothesline
and drops Old Glory (knee drop) for the pin.
Rating:
D. Shockingly watchable match
but again, why did they need to have this match? Was there no one on
the roster that needed a TV win? It’s like they just pick these
names out of a hat like at Lethal Lottery. The match wasn’t even bad
but it doesn’t need to exist given some of the people on this roster.
Bret
Hart says he doesn’t mind if the fans don’t like him. They don’t
matter and he’s already taken care of Flair, Benoit and Booker
(complete with making fun of the way Booker speaks). No one is safe
around here and he’ll take out anyone he wants.
Saturn
vs. Kanyon
This
should be good. Kanyon grabs two quick rollups for two each but
Saturn grabs a quick belly to back suplex. Schiavone of course brags
about the basketball match instead of talking about ANYTHING going on
during the match. Lee Marshall of all people gets him back on track.
Saturn fires off some kicks in the corner but gets caught in a
neckbreaker to put both guys down.
We
hit the chinlock from Kanyon followed by a hotshot for two more. A
PerfectPlex gets two for Kanyon as does a slingshot elbow drop from
the apron. Kanyon drives shoulders into Saturn’s ribs in the corner
but misses a charging shoulder and gets rolled up for two. The fans
want Arn and go WOO a lot. Saturn scores with a great looking
superkick for two but walks into the Flatliner for the same result.
The Moss Covered Three Handled Family Credenza gets yet another two
for Kanyon but Saturn pops up and hits the Death Valley Driver for
the pin.
Rating:
C. This was more of a spot fest
with both guys hitting one big move after another. As usual the
story hasn’t gone anywhere yet but it was still entertaining stuff
which is what this dull show has needed. Why couldn’t these guys get
another five minutes and Roadblock’s match been cut?
Eddie
Guerrero vs. Psychosis
The
Chavo chants before the match already get on Eddie’s nerves and
Psychosis uses the distraction to get a quick rollup for two. They
trade rollups and counters to start until Eddie grabs a quick suplex
to take over. Psychosis pops back up and kicks Guerrero in the head
to send him outside. A nice plancha from the top takes Eddie out
again and he’s kind enough to just stand there and wait on Psychosis
to go up. Back in and Eddie grabs a quick shoulder breaker and
starts in on the arm.
We
get an actual hammerlock in a cruiserweight match. I don’t remember
the last time I saw that. Eddie stays on the arm but misses a charge
in the corner. Psychosis goes up and here’s Chavo, dressed like the
Lone Ranger. Psychosis dives on him for no apparent reason before
Eddie dives on both of them for a slightly more adequately explored
reason. Back in and Psychosis hits a top rope hurricanrana and a
gordbuster, only to have Chavo hit him with the stick horse. Eddie’s
frog splash is good for the pin.
Rating:
C. Chavo continues to entertain
but I’m not sure where they’re going with the story at this point.
They’ve kind of hit a wall as Eddie has taken his hair but Chavo
doesn’t seem to mind. At least it’s fun stuff though which is more
than Chavo had been doing before this whole thing started. Eddie is
getting a nice push out of it too.
We
get the Nash interview from earlier which leads us into Scott Hall
with something to say. No survey since California is clearly Black
and White country, so on to Nash. Apparently Nash is a big goof who
wouldn’t help Hall when he had money troubles, so Hall turned to
Hogan and Bischoff. Hall declares himself Medium Sexy the Nash
Killer and that he’s sexier than ten movie stars. Again, not much
here.
Scott
Norton vs. Ciclope
Norton,
officially in black and white, powerbombs him for the pin in 15
seconds.
Stevie
Ray is here to explain why he has the TV Title. Apparently Booker
was in his hospital bed and looked up at Stevie (“With those big
brown eyes”) and told Stevie how great of a champion he was.
Booker gave Stevie power of attorney and Ray has a hand written note
to prove it. Booker even picked the opponent tonight.
TV
Title: Stevie Ray vs. Damien
Another
total squash with Ray just mauling him. A powerslam gets no cover
and Damien makes the jobber comeback with chops and a dropkick.
Stevie clotheslines him down and the Slap Jack retains the title.
Here
are Hennig, Rude and Hall with something to say. Rude thinks Page is
nothing more than a flash in the pan. Hennig things DDP stands for
Dirtball Dallas Punk and complains that his bird is too sick to
relieve himself on a picture of DDP. Konnan comes out for Wolfpack
reasons, calls Hall a mark, slaps Hennig, and runs.
Rey
Mysterio Jr. vs. Juventud Guerrera
In
a funny bit, Tenay talks about some Oakland A’s being here. Heenan:
“Gehrig is here.” Tony: “Lou?” Heenan: “Al. He parks
cars.” Feeling out process to start with Rey taking control of the
arm and ducking an enziguri. Juvy chops away until Rey goes for a
springboard dropkick but gets dropkicked out of the air. A suplex
gets two for Guerrera and we hit the chinlock.
Back
up and Mysterio gets two off a rollup before kicking Juvy in the back
to take over. Now it’s Juvy heading to the apron and connecting with
his springboard missile dropkick for two. They head up top with Juvy
being punched out to the floor, setting up a BIG dive from Mysterio.
Back in and Rey hits the ropes, only to get caught in the Juvy Driver
for a very close two. The 450 is broken up and Rey sets for the West
Coast Pop, only to have Bret Hart of all people come out with a chair
for the DQ.
Rating:
C+. Surprising ending aside,
what else were you expecting from Guerrera vs. Mysterio? It’s good
to see Rey getting to test his knee out against someone who can give
him a run for his money. Juvy continues to be awesome but never
seems to go anywhere as a result. Some things never change around
here.
Both
small guys are beaten down with the chair. Juvy gets a Sharpshooter
and Mysterio is put in the figure four around the post. This is
really the best thing they can come up with for Bret Hart?
Hugh
Morrus/Barbarian vs. Marty Jannetty/Chris Adams
Oh
you have got to be kidding me. Adams pounds on Morrus to start
before bringing Marty in for a superkick. The crowd is clearly
heading to the concourse during this. Everything quickly breaks down
and Adams is sent to the floor, allowing Morrus to moonsault Jannetty
for the pin. Another nothing match.
Post
match Meng comes out and destroys people. They’re so strapped for
ideas that they did the same low level angle twice in one night.
Here’s
Dean Malenko who demands to see Arn Anderson face to face. Here’s
Arn to the awesome Horsemen music but Mongo comes out before Dean can
say anything. A LOUD We Want Flair starts up as Dean talks about
Benoit being a close friend. Malenko talks about being in New Japan
and getting to talk to Arn while he was on a tour. They got to know
each other pretty well back then and they have a common work ethic.
Anderson got Dean a job in WCW and Malenko never got a chance to
thank him.
Dean
says Benoit and Mongo believe in Anderson and Dean thinks Arn’s
guidance could be what they all need. Malenko holds up the four
fingers and that’s enough for Arn. He’s told them this once before
and now he’s going to do it with some bass in his voice. You don’t
just join the Horsemen. It’s a team you’re chosen for. Being a
Horseman means wrestling all the time even when you don’t want to.
It means wrestling when you bury your grandmother in the morning and
when your son has burned a hole in his foot that you can fit your
thumb in.
Dean
hasn’t earned the right to hold up four fingers because he doesn’t
understand it. Nobody has the fire in them like Arn does and he
takes off his shirt. He wants to be out here but his neck won’t let
him do it anymore. The Horsemen are over, so let them be over.
Amazing stuff here from Anderson, even by his standards.
Curt
Hennig vs. Diamond Dallas Page
Hall,
Rude and Vincent come out with Hennig. Page goes into the crowd as
usual but here’s Konnan before Page gets to the ring. We take a
break and indeed it’s a tag match.
Diamond
Dallas Page/Konnan vs. Curt Hennig/Scott Hall
Hennig
starts with Konnan but it’s off to Page before any contact. They
lock up and fight to the floor where Hennig slaps him in the back of
the head. Back in and Page grabs a swinging neckbreaker. A second
attempt sends Hennig running to the floor and it’s off to Hall vs.
Konnan. Hall grabs the arm for the driving shoulders before slapping
Konnan in the back of the head. That must be an AWA move.
Konnan
fights up and shoves Hall down to slow the pace. Back up and Konnan
grabs a quick X Factor before Hall gets punched back and forth like a
pinball. Page comes in but can’t hit the Diamond Cutter but
clotheslines Hall down to set up a Konnan chinlock. They get up
again and Hall can’t catch a cross body. Instead he lifts Konnan up
for a fallaway slam to take over. Off to Hennig for a knee lift
before he suckers Page in.
Hall
breaks up a hot tag attempt with an elbow to the back and puts on a
reverse chinlock. Scott lets go of the hold and lets Konnan up
before a double clothesline puts both guys down. Now it’s the hot
tag to Page who punches both Hall and Hennig from corner to corner.
Hall gets in a cheap shot though and Hennig drops Page with a right
hand for two. A great dropkick and right hand both get the same and
we take a break.
Back
with Page pounding on Hennig in the corner before Hall sneaks in
behind him for the fall away slam. Off to the abdominal stretch on
Page’s bad ribs before it’s back to Hennig for more stomping. Hall
comes back in for a clothesline and sleeper but Page counters into
one of his own. Scott suplexes his way to freedom and both guys are
down again. The double tag brings in Konnan vs. Hennig as everything
breaks down. Rude gets in a cheap shot on Konnan and it’s a
PerfectPlex for the pin as Page Diamond Cuts Hall on the floor.
Rating:
C+. The match was fine but it
was at the end of a very long show. They did the formula stuff here
and that’s a good idea for old school guys like Hall and Hennig. It
doesn’t really advance anything but it’s nice to see the factions at
war actually in a match for a change. Decent enough stuff.
Overall
Rating:
D. This had its moments
but it’s just WAY too long. Like I said, they had two Meng vs.
Barbarian segments in the same show. Let that sink in for a minute.
The show wasn’t completely horrible but there was no reason for this
to be a three hour episode. It would have been much better had they
given some of the matches more time, but for some reason they flew
through everything instead of letting anything other than the main
event develop.

Remember to check out my website at kbwrestlingreviews.com and head over to my Amazon author page with wrestling books for just $4 at:

http://www.amazon.com/Thomas-Hall/e/B00E6282W6

BoD Saturday Night Thread

On tap for tonight:

College Football, with the Big Ten, ACC, and Pac Ten  title games
World Series of Fighting on NBC
NHL
NBA
HBO Boxing after dark, highlighted by Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Joseph Agbeko
Saturday Night Live is brand new tonight with host Paul Rudd and musical guest One Direction

Also, Konnan’s Volume 2 shoot with RF Video won the poll with 41% of the vote. The recap will be posted on Thursday.

As always, discuss anything else you want to tonight in this thread

Kayfabe Commentaries Timeline Series: 1995 WWF as told by Kevin Nash, Disc Two

This disc runs at one hour and thirty-two minutes long

JUNE




Skip (Chris Candido) makes his debut, defeating Scott Taylor during an episode of “Superstars.” Sean asks Nash about him, who said he never spent much time with him but that he took one hell of a powerbomb. Nash said that Waltman put him over for his work. Sean reminds Nash that Waltman told the story on his “YouShoot” DVD of Sunny wearing a mohair sweater with Shawn coming out of her room with it all over his face as Nash says that was his story to tell. Sean then asks if Chris knew about Sunny and Shawn as Nash said he heard many stories about Sunny. Sean asks if Sunny ever came on to him and he said no. When Sean asked why, Nash said because he wasn’t a prick, implying that was the type of guy Sunny was into.

Nash introduces Antonio Rocca into the “WWE Hall of Fame.” He was chosen because he was the champ. sean asks about the early days of the HOF as Nash said that Andre was the only guy in it for a few years, joking that it was the “Wall of Fame” as all it contained was a plaque of Andre on the wall inside of Titan Towers. They talk about the HOF today as Nash said he wouldn’t want to go up and make a speech. Sean asks him how he and the ohter wrestlers feel about the legitimacy of the HOF, as Nash said that he cant believe how guys like Rick Rude are not in but Koko B. Ware is then says that he would decline the opportunity if he got the call until guys like Rude get nominated.

Mabel defeats Savio Vega to win the “King of the Ring” Tournament. Nash joked that Mabel won as Vince wanted to go back to guys with good bodies. Nash then compares the rapping from Men on a Mission to guys using blackface. Nash liked the group but couldn’t believe that the best rapper the WWE could find then was Oscar.

JULY




On July 8th, Vince McMahon announced that President Jack Tunney had stepped down and was replaced by Gorilla Monsoon. In reality, the WWE was shutting down their offices in Toronto in a cost-cutting move. Nash calls Tunney a “fucking crook” and said that his friend, Billy Red Lyons, would always have a new Cadillac whenever they went to Toronto. Nash said the payoffs were shit and that after the conversion rate, it seemed like you owed the company money. Nash did put over the atmosphere in the Maple Leaf Garden. On the subject of Gorilla, Nash said he was a great guy and would no-sell everything bad that happened to him while maintaining an upbeat attitude.

Nash tells a story of when he was told that he was dropping the belt to Shawn. Vince took him to the sound studio, with Jim Ross off on the side looking through the glass to see if Nash would go off. Anyway, Vince spends 35 minutes pitching an idea to Nash about fighting Mike Tyson in Central Park for charity, then at the end, casually dropped that the was going to drop the belt. Nash said that he couldn’t believe that Vince, who owned the company, made up a bullshit story to soften the blow about him losing the belt. Nash said he wasn’t pissed about the story, stating that Vince has to deal with a lot of bullshit anyway, but felt that he was close enough for Vince to be honest with him and just say that business was down and he wasn’t drawing with the belt.

Next, is when Jeff Jarrett and the Roadie quit the company after Jeff lost the Intercontinental Title to Shawn at the second “In Your House” PPV. Nash said that Jeff got along with everyone and that when the Kliq were split up on the road, Jeff would ride with them. Nash then talks about how as champ, he had to work house shows with Backlund and then King Kong Bundy. He then talks about his last run and how they put him in a ladder match, which was probably the last match anyone would ever want to see him wrestle. Nash then says that it is a business and if you are not a mark, they cannot fuck with you. From this, he brings up the “Fingerpoke of Doom” and how people bitched at him for beating Goldberg, saying he was more over than him, then sarcastically points out how how he put himself over just to hold the belt for twenty-four hours. Nash then asks for someone to try to find a time in which he gloated about ending Goldberg’s streak. Nash then brings up how the crowds were chanting “Goldberg sucks” and they had to pipe in the Goldberg stuff. He then talks about the show in Salisbury, MD and how he told them that this was a WWF town and that they would be cheering for him and Hall, which they did, and Hall went with the crowd.

On July 24th, the Dark Match before RAW, Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels teamed up for the first time to face the Blu Brothers. Nash is asked if they friendly here and Nash said no, that they never were. Nash said they had a mutual respect then and that there was a running joke that Shawn said he was better than him. Nash himself admits that Shawn was the best he ever wrestled. Sean then asks Nash what Shawn would tell him about Bret. Nash tells a story of how he was having difficulty with Bret, after the whole powerbomb deal at the “In Your House,” and that he was with Shawn and told him that he was not going to drop the belt to Bret. Shawn, who was pissed, told him he had to drop the belt to him because he was going to get it next. Nash points out it was the only fight that the every had. This was prior to the Kliq meeting with Vince in Indianapolis.

AUGUST




“WrestleMania: The Arcade Game” is released. Nash is the champion but did not make the game. Sean brings up how Doink was in the game then also mentions how Matt Borne said on one of the Kayfabe Commentary releases that Nash should have never been broken into the business. Nash responds in a hilarious manner by how devastated he was hearing that come from someone like Borne then jokes about how Borne got the last laugh by making the arcade game. You have to see this for yourself as Nash was a fucking riot explaining all of this.

During a match in Ohio, Sid defeated Razor Ramon and dropped him on the railing, legitimately injuring Hall to the point that he was coughing up blood. Nash is asked if he ever hurt anyone in the ring and he said one time when referee Jack Doan told him he could bump and he threw him out of the ring. Doan went through the ropes like he was Superman and fell on the floor, injuring his wrist. He then said that he was surprised he didnt hurt Big Show and said when he powerbombed him, he was close to 600 lbs. Nash originally suggested that he hit him with a gimmicked pot of coffee then just pin him. Nash said that he was more hurt than him from the move and also claimed that Big Show told him that Hogan went to him afterwards, stating Nash dropped him on his head on purpose.

Next, is the ladder match between Hall and Michaels at SummerSlam. Nash said that since they were going up against not just WCW but also Disney, the office told him that they were not allowed to use the ladder as a weapon. He said they were up to 4am trying to put the match together. Nash also credits HHH for putting together half of the match. Sean tells Nash that Sid was originally supposed to face Michaels in the ladder match and asked if he new what happened. Nash said he didny but can imagine that when they approached him with that, Michaels probably told them they were crazy for wanting him to carry Sid in a ladder match and requested to face Hall. Nash also says that “Crazy Shawn” developed from this match as he injured himself greatly and went nuts with drugs.

Nash then talks about his SummerSlam match with Mabel. He said that going into the match, his back was hurt and he asked Mabel to take it easy on him but he ended up crashing down on his lower back with a sitdown splash. Nash said that Mabel hurt one of the Samoans prior to the match, which is a feat in itself, and that he ended up straining his abdomen. After the match, he asked him “what the fuck” and claimed that Vince gave him his papers on the spot but Nash told Vince not to fire him and that he just made a mistake. Mabel was constantly injuring people at the time and wasn’t around much longer.

They now talk about Tatanka and how he was suspended after a woman named him in an incident. Nash said it was the “Helter Skelter”incident as there was blood smeared all over the walls in the hallway. He then recalls sitting with Taker one time and a goth girl came by after one of the boys “H-Bombed” her and she was with the cops in the lobby the next morning. When asked about the Tatanka incident, Nash carefully says that he thinks it was Jimmy Del Ray who gimmicked the girl and that Tatanka was with him that night and knows for a fact that he did not do anything.

SEPTEMBER




The “B” house shows are eliminated. Nash said that he didn’t cut his pay but it prevented him from going to Erie, PA three times a year. He calls the building a piece of shit and that you couldn’t draw 3,000 people if you were giving money away.

Nash is now asked about the debut of WCW “Monday Nitro.” Nash points out how they were doing it from a mall and that it was such a WCW move. Nash said that he was watching the show with his boys and that the WWF production truck was playing the show. Nash also brings up how before the nWo, WCW was doing monster truck angles and stuff with King Curtis.

Dean Douglas makes his debut. Nash said that it didn’t matter what Douglas did, as he was DOA, due to the fact that he was an “indy guy.” Nash said that he never had heat with him and that he liked Douglas, Sean also brings up his YouShoot and how Shane said he liked Nash when he was alone. Nash liked Douglas for realizing that there was a world outside of wrestling and calls him smart. Nash then said when Waltman gave him the thumbs down after the match, it was the end.

On September 25th, RAW and Nitro are on live at the same time. Clearance Mason debuted and Nash said he wasn’t a real attorney. When asked about the race angle, Nash said that you have to commit 100% if you want to work and compares to how they approached the situation to being “half pregnant.”

Marty Jannetty returned on the same episode. Nash said that Marty and Shawn were definitely distant and compares it to a guy meeting his ex-wife at a party after several years. Nash also says it was an uncomfortable situation and that he never brought it up with Shawn.

OCTOBER




On October 4th, the WWF began a tour of Europe in England and on this date, the incident in which Man Mountain Rock brought his video camera and recorded what went on backstage and on the bus. Nash confirms that this happened and that you could actually hear him in the background on one clip but that he never rode with them.

On October 8th, the Harris Twins confronted Shawn Michaels. Nash said that Shawn legit needed a bodyguard as he wouldnt back down. Nash said that he likes the Harris Brothers and when he came back, they told him what happened. Nash said while he didnt want anyone beating on his friend, Shawn got over the incident so Nash was okay. When asked if he would retaliate if Shawn asked, Nash said yes. He also said that Shawn did deserve what happened to him at times. Sean asks Nash if this is what got them fired and Nash said that at the time, most of the roster was starving and they were letting guys go at the time. Nash brings up how Chief Jay Strongbow told himto never live above your means and to buy the place you live in, because they cannot take that away from you. He also said why buy a new car when you drive a new rental daily and that you do not need 7,000 square feet if you are only there three days in a row at most.

Bill Watts quit on October 13th. Nash calls him a bully and a “fucking dick.” He recalls one time in WCW, Watts told him to bend over and he hit him in the face, after being pissed about how he did in a match. Nash said he no-sold the punch and after three weeks later, Watts was telling him about making him a face a giving a push. He then tells a story of how he was having a dark match with Yokozuna, which was in of the old blue cage. Nash said the guys putting it up struggled and they do the match. Nash said he told Yoko he was going to charge him and to hit a Samoan drop. Nash then told him to drag him in the corner and try the sitdown splash but he was going to grab his leg then go out the cage. The match lasted twenty seconds. Backstage, Watts was pissed and that Nash referenced something Watts told him in WCW about being higher up on the food chain than he was. Nash was pretty damn funny telling the story about Watts.

Up next is when Shawn gets assaulted by several servicemen outside of Club 37 in New York. Nash said that when he read Meltzer’s column of the story and laughs at him calling Waltman a “legitimate tough guy.” Nash jokes that you shouldnt book Shawn without him. Nash says that he was told that Shawn was absolutely bombed and hitting on a girl that belonged to the Marine. He then said Shawn was half-passed out and heard he got assaulted while he was sitting in the car.

Goldust debuted on October 22nd, defeating Marty Jannetty. Nash is asked if the guys were freaked out by this and Hall said that during his feud with Goldust, it was getting tough explaining the show to his kid with the homosexuality involved in the storyline. Nash then jokes how they had to counter the red-hot Dungeon of Doom feud in WCW that was going on at the time by taking a risk.

Dean Douglas gets awarded the Intercontinental Title, then lost it to Razor Ramon. Nash said that Hall would always tell Vince that he was going to go to Japan and would ask Vince for a little more of the merchandise cut and thinks Vince gave him the belt to appease him.

Nash talks about the dirtsheets and how if you were caught having one, you would get crucified by the locker room. He then said that they had no idea about who guys like Ahmed Johnson were or any international stars. Nash then joked about an idea for an Ahmed vignette that featured Karen Black and would recreate a scene from “Mandingo.”

NOVEMBER 




1-2-3 Kid turns heel on Razor Ramon. Nash said at that point, they wanted to work with the guys they wanted to instead of some of the slugs. Nash said he believes Hall gave notice at this point and back then, you needed to give a 90 day written notice.

Nash talks about Mr. Perfect. Nash said he was the man and that he smartened up Hall and Shawn in the AWA.

Bret defeats Nash at Survivor Series to win the Title. Nash said he wanted to have a good match and could have one with Bret. Nash is asked about the announcer’s table spot. He said that he was speaking with Bret on the phone discussing the match and they were basically finishing each other’s sentences going over the match. They got the idea for the cable-tying spot after Owen ribbed Bret after tying him up with a telephone cord. Nash said he told the camera guys to make sure they caught him turning around and swearing. Nash said he got over from the Rumble and wanted to get back to being an ass-kicker. He then talks about after being portrayed as an ass-kicker at the Rumble, they cut his balls off. Nash then goes over all of the shitty gimmicks he had before becoming Diesel.

The following night on RAW, Diesel interrupted a match and cut an interview stating that he was no longer had to be the “corporate puppet” he was as the champion. He said that he watched the movie “Heat” and that DeNiro is the clear-cut heel and Pacino the face and despite being the heel, everyone in the theater wanted DeNiro to go over and from a psychology major point of view, saw that and knew how that was the fucked up part of our society. He then says that Vince will always see the American-flag waving guy as the face. When asked if he watched ECW, Nash said no and that the anti-corporate guy would get over. Sean brings up how it was a precursor to the Stone Cold character and Nash said that Steve is his friend and that he was able to do better with the character. Nash finishes by stating that he doesn’t need validation for being creative or for being successful in wrestling as he can wake up every morning and sip coffee while looking at the ocean and realize that he is doing pretty good.

On the Novembe 25th house show, Shane Douglas and Scott Hall got into a backstage argument due to the Kliq believing Douglas was faking a back injury for a built-in excuse to lose to Hall. Nash said that was not the correct story. He said that Shane was hurt in Europe and HHH had to work twice. So, Nash said that Yokozuna yelled at Dean on the bus, saying that he should have watched the match with HHH to see what Hall needs in the ring then told Douglas that there are no days off and to get out there. Yoko apparently threw in a lot of f-bombs. Nash said that Yoko was a “BSK” guy and adds that the undertaker was going out there with a mask after his face was nearly caved in and he still wrestled.

DECEMBER




At the In Your House PPV, Bret defeated Davey Boy Smith and bled throughout the match at a time when blading was banned in the company. Nash is asked if Bret was going into business for himself and Nash said that he did the same in a cage match with Owen. Nash said it couldnt have been hardway because after a few minutes of bleeding, it swells up and stops.

Nash talks about how Alundra Blayze showed up on Nitro and tossed the WWF Women’s Title in the trash can. Nash jokes that his wife was glad that Alundra was gone and when pressed about the issue, Nash denied that he was ever close with her.

On the December 18th edition of RAW, two factions of wrestlers were in the locker room. The “BSK,” who would wear the initials on their baseball hats. They consisted of the Undertaker, Yokozuna, Fatu, Duke Droese, and Owen Hart. Another group led by the Smoking Gunns, Davey Boy Smith, and Goldust all wore red handkerchiefs. Nash jokes about the red handkerchiefs being over and references the film “Cruising” and how it San Francisco it meant that they wanted to be pissed on.

The “Village Voice” reported that Vince McMahon offered his former assistant, Emily Fineberg, a six-figure sum to take part in a movie about his life that would have Sylvester Stallone play the part of himself.Nash jokes that he would have James Garner play Vince.

On December 30th, Bret Hart defeated Nash in a ladder match. Nash said he liked gimmick matches, as the smoke-and-mirrors helped him out. He then questions why have a cage match if you can’t juice and how it makes no sense. He then brings up his “Hell in a Cell” match with HHH and how it was set up to fuck him. He says that when you leave you can come back but they will book you first then fuck with you later. He then said after that, he told his wife to get the clippers and wanted to shave his head and come back on his terms.

Final Thoughts: Another great disc. Nash is one of the more engaging storytellers you will ever find on a shoot interview. Even though he went off topic a lot, he still entertained whenever he spoke. As far as painting a picture of the year(s) in question, I thought that Bruno Sammartino’s Timeline from 1963-1969 was better in that aspect but you cannot go wrong at all in picking this up. It is lenghty but the time will fly by. I give this one of my highest recommendations.

Also, please vote on which shoot you would like to see reviewed next week. The votes are all very close so click on the link below and see which recap you would like to read on Thursday:

http://poll.pollcode.com/8491198